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Discussion Starter #1
I have an old Bari that I acquired some time ago. It needed a lot of work but by the time it was finished and money spent I was playing a lot of Tenor so 'didn't get around to it'. That was in a Floyd tribute band and needing a different sound and response (using Metallite and Fibracell 3.5's) from what I expect I'll be getting from this old baby - which is a Martin stencil.

Where to start with a mouthpiece and reed. The only mouthpiece I have is a Rico Graftonite B5 so that may do - what about reeds? I'll be aiming at sorting my tone out and trying to get some altissimo notes (will be working on overtones at first). I'm used to Fibracell on Tenor but prefer not to go there on this Bari.
 

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After a long time on alto & tenor, when I added bari I went with the old standby Yamaha 5 (plastic) until I became comfortable with the horn. I then settled on another old reliable, a metal Link 7.

I use fibracell on everything, VERY pleased with their performance on bari.
 

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Cheers

Maybe I will go Fibracell eventually but I cannot get them locally.
I would start with Yamaha 5C mouthpiece and Vandoren #2 or 2 1/2 reeds.

The first thing you need to work on is learning how to blow through the baritone sax with a full baritone size breath and to get a good full round sound that genuinely projects, not a reed-flappy buzzy duck call sound that you think projects but actually just annoys.

I wouldn't be worrying about altissimo at this point. As a tenor player your issues are going to be on the other end of the horn.
 

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What he said, plus you should use a tuner with an old bari like that, especially at first, which may have issues in the high register. I think the Rico 5 is probably a decent starter. You may have a tendency to bite on the high notes which on such horns throws the high notes sharp. If you have an android or I-phone there are many free tuner apps. I got one about a month ago and its a huge help especially in hectic situations like setting up for a gig or even during a show if you have a place to set it close enough. But starting out with a new instrument/mouthpiece it would be crucial to have before you develop bad habits.
 

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The Forestone is also a pretty decent synth reed, it may be easier in Down Under to get them than the Fibracell. I started out with a Vandoren but the tip opening was too small and moved on to a Berg Larsen 110-1 (used) which is a very fine MPC, especially with vintage horns. Best of luck, enjoy the new adventure, I hope, as much as I do.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks all

Yep definitely be using a tuner - like you say it is an old horn. The guy who worked on it is one of the best around here and I know he spent a decent amount of time on the intonation. I've used a Snark tuner in the past which I reckon is great so I'll work through all the non-altissimo notes.

Picked up a Rico Royal 2.5 at lunch just now.

I'll have to look into those Forestone reeds - had not heard of them.
 

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I use Fibracell almost exclusively on Baritone now.
You may find the Martin a little mouthpiece sensitive at first.
But after a while you’ll be able to use a larger range of pieces on it.
I play a The Martin Comm III with an old Otto Link Masterlink piece which has been opened to .110 and Fibracell 3.5 reeds.
Current model STM’s work very nicely on these horns also.
Congratulations on getting the Baritone up and running.
 

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Martins are the best- I miss mine now :(
Get the largest chamber possible. Fibracell are excellent for bari too
 

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For the Martin baritone I would get an old Woodwind Co. or Riffault at first, while I got familiar with the horn.

Or get a stock STM and be prepared to have it trimmed up by a refacer.
 

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Thanks all

Yep definitely be using a tuner - like you say it is an old horn. The guy who worked on it is one of the best around here and I know he spent a decent amount of time on the intonation.
If your tech spent a lot of time on intonation, find out what mouthpiece he was using. If you start chasing everyone else’s recommendations for what works on their horns instead of yours, you may be missing the mark.
 

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Martins are the best- I miss mine now :(
Get the largest chamber possible. Fibracell are excellent for bari too
THIS.

BIG QUESTION HERE: "Martin Stencil".

What year ? Do you know ? Splitbellkey ? Same side ? Can you post a photo ?

....the fact that your tech, Elecmuso, "spent a lotta time on intonation" suggests to me it's a pre-Comm III...and those Martin BigHorns pre-Comm III absolutely NEED a large chamber mouthpiece. A III is way easier to mouthpiece match than their earlier models.
With due respect to other posters....these earlier Martins are different beasts from any other old American Baritone.....IMHO, don't waste your $ on a Yama or Rico (even though it isn't much $ wasted). Forget a Selmer mouthpiece as well.

Large chamber, old-school style mouthpiece. That is what these were made for.
 

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THIS.

BIG QUESTION HERE: "Martin Stencil".

What year ? Do you know ? Splitbellkey ? Same side ? Can you post a photo ?

....the fact that your tech, Elecmuso, "spent a lotta time on intonation" suggests to me it's a pre-Comm III...and those Martin BigHorns pre-Comm III absolutely NEED a large chamber mouthpiece. A III is way easier to mouthpiece match than their earlier models.
With due respect to other posters....these earlier Martins are different beasts from any other old American Baritone.....IMHO, don't waste your $ on a Yama or Rico (even though it isn't much $ wasted). Forget a Selmer mouthpiece as well.

Large chamber, old-school style mouthpiece. That is what these were made for.
I've never played a pre-committee III Martin bari (there aren't many of these around, you know). How would an Otto Link hard rubber work? The chamber is bigger (I think, at least this is the case for tenor) than that of a Meyer, which is my choice for a 12M (which also spits up a small chamber MP). Or, how about Selmer Soloist (not S-80 or S-90 or whatever the current one is called)? I know my Selmer bass sax MP (current production) has a round chamber that's larger than the neck bore.

Only reason I say this is that the OP coming from what sounds like a rock and roll background may find the true old-school "dill pickle" MP with its almost total absence of baffle and tiny tip opening, to play about like a pair of gym socks. I know that's what they play like for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well I've had a good go today and yes - some notes in particular are difficult to play in tune. Especially F in the second register (and to a lesser degree the E below that). They are extremely sharp. Pulling it back to where it should be is hard work but I have found that closing low C and low B keys helps a lot but is a clumsy work around. Or using the LH palm keys to get those notes in the lowest register rather than using 2nd register also works OK.
I have a feeling the tech. was aiming to optimise the sound of the lowest register over good intonation over the entire horn. It was a few years ago now.
 

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Your most likely going to want a proper large chambered piece with scooped out side rails for that horn.
That will make it far more manageable.
Woodwind Co, Riffault, Conn etc.
They’re generally not too expensive.
They require a lot of air if you’re going to project with them.
I’ve had good success with them by adding a baffle and opening them up a bit.
 

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Middle E and F being sharp is a classic baritone issue when mouthpiece chamber is too small and the MP is pulled out to compensate.

Get a larger chamber MP and push it further on. For a more modern mouthpiece I recommend the Meyer. This had big effects on intonation on my Conn 12M.

Also you will need to work on lowering your "input pitch" by adapting your embouchure, oral cavity, and air stream.

Middle E and F are made more stable and in-tune by opening the low C# (counterintuitive but it generally works).
 
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