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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have decided I want to stick with my RR New Yorker mouthpiece forever. For this reason, I would like to get rid of those obnoxious white inlays. Is there a gentle way to do that? I love the mouthpiece most for its playing aspects, but still I would not want to scratch it all up.
 

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Cover it with a black tooth patch.

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you could ask RR what kind of paint they use and then try to find a solvent that will attack the paint but not effect the HR.
 

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OP - Are you talking about an inlay or the paint on the label?

If it is paint, you can just paint over it with the color of your choice - including black.

I thought you were talking about an actual inlaid bite plate of white plastic.
 

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OP - Are you talking about an inlay or the paint on the label?

If it is paint, you can just paint over it with the color of your choice - including black.

I thought you were talking about an actual inlaid bite plate of white plastic.
Take a look at a RR New Yorker and it should be obvious.

You could always paint over it or fill it with black epoxy, but both those approaches could be problematic or lead to more aesthetic problems down the road. Better to remove the paint if you can find a good way to do it.
 

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Take a look at a RR New Yorker and it should be obvious.

You could always paint over it or fill it with black epoxy, but both those approaches could be problematic or lead to more aesthetic problems down the road. Better to remove the paint if you can find a good way to do it.
It is quite easy to fill grooves with paint. I’ve been doing it for decades on my preferred mouthpieces. I have posted the procedure here before, and use acrylic paint as available in small bottles at art supply stores.

Please let us know if you actually know how to safely remove the paint, and have personally performed the operation.
 

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It is quite easy to fill grooves with paint. I’ve been doing it for decades on my preferred mouthpieces. I have posted the procedure here before, and use acrylic paint as available in small bottles at art supply stores.

Please let us know if you actually know how to safely remove the paint, and have personally performed the operation.
Once again, take a look at one of those RR mouthpieces. Those RR logos are bigger than what I would consider grooves.
 

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Once again, take a look at one of those RR mouthpieces. Those RR logos are bigger than what I would consider grooves.
OK, so I looked at it again. Looks the same as before.

Bottom line: If it was painted before, it can be painted again - either with black or some other color. I used to paint my Lamberson mouthpiece logos, and his machined logo was deeper and wider than most of these appear.

I offer solutions with processes that I have successfully used in the past. All you offer is contention. Got anything useful to share?
 

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OK, so I looked at it again. Looks the same as before.

Bottom line: If it was painted before, it can be painted again - either with black or some other color. I used to paint my Lamberson mouthpiece logos, and his machined logo was deeper and wider than most of these appear.

I offer solutions with processes that I have successfully used in the past. All you offer is contention. Got anything useful to share?
How about a tooth patch.

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for your suggestions, guys. I looked again and saw there were fine grooves which seem to have been filled with paint. There is a shop selling model aircraft kits next door to my place. I might find suitable paint and tools there, should I actually decide to go for that option.
 

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How about a tooth patch.

Next?
Yes, I responded to a question about covering inlays without looking up RR, and learning that there are no inlays. My bad. I own that.
 

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What is an 'RR'?

But whatever, you generally would not use any kind of solvent on a HR/polymer mouthpiece, especially not Acetone (fingernail polish remover). The absolute best thing to do is to simply live with it and let it wear off over time. Most white markings on black mouthpieces over the years, except for actual inserts, have been very temporary.
 

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What is an 'RR'?

But whatever, you generally would not use any kind of solvent on a HR/polymer mouthpiece, especially not Acetone (fingernail polish remover). The absolute best thing to do is to simply live with it and let it wear off over time. Most white markings on black mouthpieces over the years, except for actual inserts, have been very temporary.
+1 A ligature is gonna cover most of it probably anyways. If you can't find a safe way to remove it, I would leave it alone and let it fall off over time. Adding more paint to it (black) seems like making matters worse IMO. Over time the black will flake leaving white and you might wind up with an uglier mess than you started with.
Possibly if you let it soak in room temperature water while you are not using it, that might encourage the white paint to fail sooner.
 

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What is an 'RR'?

But whatever, you generally would not use any kind of solvent on a HR/polymer mouthpiece, especially not Acetone (fingernail polish remover). The absolute best thing to do is to simply live with it and let it wear off over time. Most white markings on black mouthpieces over the years, except for actual inserts, have been very temporary.
RR = Retro Revival brand mouthpieces

+1 to no solvent
 

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Thanks; I was thinking maybe 'Rico Royal' or something - Retro revival is a new one on me.
 

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I have noticed some of the current boutique mouthpiece makers engrave (stamp?) their logos, brand, etc. very deeply and then fill with white paint. To me, having grown up with MPs where the stamping was generally very light and maybe faintly enhanced with white or gold, it seems gaudy. Personally I'd go over it with a black Sharpie. Others' taste will vary. It has no effect on how the thing works.
 

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I think it may be motivated by marketing. If an endorser or other player sounds good we often ask what mouthpiece they are playing on. If you can see the markings easily or some other distinctive feature it can create more sales.
Well, of course the maker wants his mouthpiece to be readily identifiable.

Personally I don't like the over-advertised look (which is why I don't wear logo T shirts, for example) but de gustibus disputandum. I feel that if I am going to be a walking advertisement for Nike, or whatever, I need to be getting paid.

At any rate a black Sharpie will solve the problem quickly.
 

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Well, of course the maker wants his mouthpiece to be readily identifiable.

Personally I don't like the over-advertised look (which is why I don't wear logo T shirts, for example) but de gustibus disputandum. I feel that if I am going to be a walking advertisement for Nike, or whatever, I need to be getting paid.
+ 2.3

I prefer having conversations with other musicians if they like my sound. No need to have some advertisement that distracts or draws attention.
 
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