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Discussion Starter #1
When I listen to my self, I notice there's this buzzyness in my tone that I want to get rid of. Anybody know how I can change my embouchure/airflow/etc to remove it, or make it less prominent? If it's relevant, I play tenor, and I started not too long ago.
 

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Usually it's a too soft reed or the wrong reed type. What mouthpiece and reeds are you using??


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The reed could definitely have an important influence.

If you're looking at things you can do with your embouchure in combination with checking out some different reeds, you could try messing around with your bite. That is, varying where your lower teeth are in relation to your upper teeth. Also, try varying where your airstream is directed where it reaches the mouthpiece - so you could imagine you're blowing air up towards your nose, or down towards your chin. Also, you could try varying how much of the mouthpiece is in your mouth. Also, you could try adjusting your strap so the horn hangs higher or lower. Also you could try changing the shape of your vocal tract by thinking about forming different vowel sounds while you play.

One other thing to keep in mind is that your sound will be perceived differently to a listener than it is by you, because you're getting vibrations transmitted through your jaw and skull. So record yourself with a good mic, if possible, and find out what you really sound like.

As you get further away from the horn, too, your sound will get mellower/darker (less buzzy). So you might sound like a two-stroke engine up close, but from ten metres away, your sound could be beautifully rounded.

One last thing is to be aware that our ears are more sensitive to certain frequencies, so a sound that seems harsh or just has a lot of presence is likely boosted around 3000Hz. This might be what's going on, which is great if you want to cut through or for your sound to carry.

In other words, you've got two options - reduce the 'buzzyness', or possibly discover that you're on to something that you really like without realising it (I'm not advocating one or the other - just something to be aware of).
 

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definitely the reed could be at fault in combination with that mouthpiece and you. You could learn to manipulate the tone by subtoning or altering the position of your lower-lip. You could , alternatively, start looking for a less buzzing set up. A good start would be a blue box Vandoren reed just a little thicker that you are comfortable with at the moment and work on it. Mind you the opposite of buzzing , I think, is dull.........you need to be somewhere in between, perhaps.
 

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I also think it is most likely the reeds... people recommend softer reeds to beginners, but I suggest not going any lower than 2.5.
 

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Mind you the opposite of buzzing , I think, is dull.........you need to be somewhere in between, perhaps.
Yeah, the 'grass is greener' syndrome is alive and well. There are other threads here where players complain their tone is too clean: "how do i add more edge & buzz?"
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I use a Selmer C* and for reeds Vandoren Blue Box Bass Clarinet size 4 and La Voz Hard. I used to play clarinet and bass clarinet and I'm used to hard reeds. On the Vandoren there's a lot less buzz but on the La Voz there's significant buzz. Thanks for all the suggestions:)
 

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La Voz are much brighter and "reedy" sounding than your Vandoren blue boxes. Most people use them for jazzier music, plus they're a poor match to your C*. (I am presuming you have the S80 C*) Get off the bass clarinet reeds, use Tenor 3's to start and work up to a 3.5. BC reeds have too much reed material and thinner tips, which also contributes to buzz. They're also soft, compared to equivalent tenor reeds on the same mouthpiece.

Consider your embouchure too. Lower lip and jaw position are paramount to "buzz". Breathe in cool air, breathe out warm and blow through the horn. Do long tones for fifteen minutes during your warm up. Since you're using 4's, I'm suspecting you are biting a bit, so really question how you're approaching the horn.
 
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