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I just posted a new review and sound clips of the GetASax GS Meyer NY Bros Replica alto saxophone mouthpiece. This an exact replica of this vintage classic Meyer mouthpiece that was played by the likes of Cannonball Adderley and Sonny Stitt. "The GetASax GS NEW YORK Meyer Bros 5 alto saxophone mouthpiece played perfectly with the first Rigotti Gold 3 Light reed that I tried on it. The GSNY Meyer mouthpiece has a bright and crisp tone to it. When played softly, the tone is very beautiful and light sounding to my ears. I loved playing softer ballads on this mouthpiece! When pushed louder with more air, the tone seems to go from light to a more dense focused core to the tone. The medium chamber does a great job in focusing the core sound of the mouthpiece and the rollover baffle gives the tone the nice bright crispness I describe......... Check out the full review and sound clips at the link below.........


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I love my GS NY 5 and don't understand why anyone who isn't a collector would pay $1200 for a vintage NY Meyer Bros. when these are available. I love the whole concept behind the "no muss, no fuss - just pure vintage Meyer (or Link)" approach. Brian is right about the material, too - it does feel "soft" in the mouth like vintage hard rubber. For $200, they're really, really hard to beat.

Note: I, too, experience the reed width discrepancy using Rigotti reeds. Some days it can be "chirpy."
 

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I love my GS NY 5 and don't understand why anyone who isn't a collector would pay $1200 for a vintage NY Meyer Bros. when these are available. I love the whole concept behind the "no muss, no fuss - just pure vintage Meyer (or Link)" approach. Brian is right about the material, too - it does feel "soft" in the mouth like vintage hard rubber. For $200, they're really, really hard to beat.

Note: I, too, experience the reed width discrepancy using Rigotti reeds. Some days it can be "chirpy."
My usual rule of thumb for myself is if I can’t sound good using a $100-500 mouthpiece, it‘s not the mouthpiece that’s the problem
 

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My usual rule of thumb for myself is if I can’t sound good using a $100 mouthpiece, it‘s not the mouthpiece that’s the problem
Fixed that for ya! :)
 

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Fixed that for ya! :)
Not in total disagreement, but for example I was a big supporter of handiwork like Phil Barones for a long time, I found it perfectly reasonable for 400 or so due to costs involved, materials, plating etc, getting CNC machines , respecting his ability to learn his craft by hand, etc, I do realize artisans can’t give us their stuff at base cost. I still have his jazz and SNY pieces on tenor as my favs. However, some of those prices i see for vintage gear can be a bit obtuse.

with that being said, I really like the stuff by Avel sound concepts and G-Mouthpices that I have which in their own way play just as good as the 500 dollar pieces I have for only 100-150 dollars, sometimes better, depending on context. No need to spend so much money just to get “professional” results, but I do avoid mass manufactured pieces, Vandoren for example , I just personally love hand crafted or designed pieces for their personality. But these new 3D printed things are pretty good too.
 

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Not in total disagreement, but for example I was a big supporter of handiwork like Phil Barones for a long time, I found it perfectly reasonable for 400 or so due to costs involved, materials, plating etc, getting CNC machines , respecting his ability to learn his craft by hand, etc, I do realize artisans can’t give us their stuff at base cost. I still have his jazz and SNY pieces on tenor as my favs. However, some of those prices i see for vintage gear can be a bit obtuse.

with that being said, I really like the stuff by Avel sound concepts and G-Mouthpices that I have which in their own way play just as good as the 500 dollar pieces I have for only 100-150 dollars, sometimes better, depending on context. No need to spend so much money just to get “professional” results, but I do avoid mass manufactured pieces, Vandoren for example , I just personally love hand crafted or designed pieces for their personality. But these new 3D printed things are pretty good too.
Yeah, my thought was getting a decent sound on a $100 mouthpiece like a Vandoren is definitely easy. And if you can't, the problem is simple :). The nuance of hand crafted and intricate designs or amazing replicas is definitely more my thing

I love my GSNY 5
 

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You sound great on that mouthpiece Steve. I think if you tried it with a 3 Hard or 3.5 light or medium, you might find you don't need a bigger opening. That thing just sings, that's the best I've ever heard you sound on alto.
 

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You sound great on that mouthpiece Steve . . . . That thing just sings, that's the best I've ever heard you sound on alto.
Agreed! I know "best" is subjective, but it's certainly my favorite tone Steve has channeled on alto across the sizeable number of his reviews I've heard (and read). It's just that classic vintage Meyer sound, and it's, IMO, the only piece out there that truly captures that extra buzz or sizzle of a NY Meyer Bros..

I will buy the next semi-closed tip GS Slant that comes up on Marketplace or eBay because of my experience with the NY. If I weren't already really happy on my "Celebration" (i.e., not really in the tenor mpc. market) I'd happily throw down $200 for one new.
 

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It’s a great sound but very much right down the middle. If you were able to put the sound of “alto saxophone” in a dictionary, this is what it would be. It seems it would be perfect for classic jazz. Perhaps that’s partly because of the lines and how it’s played, but man, it just sounds exactly like the epitome of the 1955-1965 sound.
 

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Played my GS NY 5 again tonight after listening to Steve's astonishing tone on it. It really is remarkable how well this thing plays! I'm incredibly impressed, and I've had it sitting on my front row of alto pieces for months now. It's not going anywhere anytime soon!

I'm no Neff, his sound is sublime here :D
 

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I enjoyed the great review as usual. Thanks Steve. There is something really lovely about the sound on the clips I have to say.

I just had question about these CNC copy pieces where the original is scanned. If you then make different tip versions of the copy, does this not then mean that the whole engineering of the piece changes? How is this part done? I know nothing about this process, but I presumed then you also need the right skilled person?
 

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I enjoyed the great review as usual. Thanks Steve. There is something really lovely about the sound on the clips I have to say.

I just had question about these CNC copy pieces where the original is scanned. If you then make different tip versions of the copy, does this not then mean that the whole engineering of the piece changes? How is this part done? I know nothing about this process, but I presumed then you also need the right skilled person?

It's referenced on the GS website, essentially Get-a-sax owner Brian has tons of pieces in his collection and has applied the original facing of each tip opening. Or as he states:

"
These also all get hand faced by me. That’s the main slow step in getting them to you, but I’m facing them as fast as I can while keeping the facing work perfect. The hand facing is a step that you can’t skip. If you try to make a replica mouthpiece and you don’t replicate a really excellent facing, you might as well not bother. So you get my favorite 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 facing that I’ve played so far, on whichever tip mouthpiece you request. Tips are as follows: 4= .069″ 5= .072″ 6= .076″ 7= .080″ 8= .085″.


The baffle on each tip opening is placed just where Meyer would place it relative to the tip rail and chamber, so each one is a really good copy of the appropriate tip of Meyer Bros. One big advantage we have is that we make these entirely in house, so we can keep improving them until they are perfect. By using biocompatible dental resin and 3D printing for the complex, organic chamber and baffle shapes, we can keep improving and iterating the model until each one is perfect. We spend a LOT of time and effort on that, and I hope that it shows in the quality of mouthpiece and the playing experience that you get."

 

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I just had question about these CNC copy pieces where the original is scanned. If you then make different tip versions of the copy, does this not then mean that the whole engineering of the piece changes? How is this part done? I know nothing about this process, but I presumed then you also need the right skilled person?
Note that they are not produced via CNC (i.e., they are not machined at all). Instead, they are 3D-printed. This is probably useful for changing the design of the piece on the fly, as prototyping with 3D-printing tends to be far cheaper than with CNC.

Also, note that when Meyer or Otto Link, or whoever, produced their original pieces, they used the same blanks for all tip openings.
 

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Note that they are not produced via CNC (i.e., they are not machined at all). Instead, they are 3D-printed. This is probably useful for changing the design of the piece on the fly, as prototyping with 3D-printing tends to be far cheaper than with CNC.

Also, note that when Meyer or Otto Link, or whoever, produced their original pieces, they used the same blanks for all tip openings.
i guess my question was that if they are mechanical reproductions of an original (whether CNC or printed) then if they have to be changed for tips, would that not need to be done by a craft person to be done well, even if this meant adjustments on the fly ? But I see J Moen replied that they are copies of actual different tip openings, which answers my question.

But thank you for the reply.
 

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Just to echo these comments - Steve, you sound really great on this one. I love all your reviews, but I have the tone of this piece seared in my brain from spending over a year perfecting it, and you sound just how I imagine it sounding. There are LOTS of pieces on the market inspired by Meyer mouthpieces. This is the only one I know of that is an extremely precise copy of this particular version of Meyer Bros (most pieces imitate the next version after this that has a fatter body than this one and plays a little darker than this one). The one we copied has been my personal alto piece for like 10 years, and I love that the clips you did sound so similar to it. Nice job, and big thanks for the review! I will certainly get you a 6 and 7 to try out. Wally Wallace is doing a video with the GS New York 7 soon as well, so it will be fun to compare those.
 

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Brian, I'm very curious about your mouthpieces and I really applaud your efforts to make high-quality gear like this reasonably affordable. This is a pretty superficial thing, but what are the odds they'd ever be made with a darker color? Regardless, I'm hoping to try your pieces for both alto and tenor in the future. Cheers!
 

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Brian, I'm very curious about your mouthpieces and I really applaud your efforts to make high-quality gear like this reasonably affordable. This is a pretty superficial thing, but what are the odds they'd ever be made with a darker color? Regardless, I'm hoping to try your pieces for both alto and tenor in the future. Cheers!
Dental resin won’t be made in a dark color anytime soon for obvious reasons :) And CNC milling imposes constraints on the types of designs you can make, (cutting radius of the bits etc) which is one big reason why it is challenging to make a precise copy with CNC. Working through that process is on the agenda though.
 

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Dental resin won’t be made in a dark color anytime soon for obvious reasons :) And CNC milling imposes constraints on the types of designs you can make, (cutting radius of the bits etc) which is one big reason why it is challenging to make a precise copy with CNC. Working through that process is on the agenda though.
Before I ordered my GS Slant, the color thing did also bother me slightly as I thought it would be weird to have a light color piece. But when the MP arrived, I found the color looks pretty cool and it looks great with a ligature in gold lacquer😄.
 

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I'm already happy with my alto mouthpiece choice, but GS is on the top of my list if I ever need a tenor mouthpiece.

How do you feel this mouthpiece compares to other "meyer, but cleaned up / better" mouthpieces that you've reviewed?
 
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