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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Someone in my city is selling a 1919 Conn C Melody with original laquered brass finish, in pretty good shape. Seeing as that I already have 2 I am thinking about repadding it and moving it along... its only selling for 100 usd. Case and a couple original "yuck" mouthpieces included. I could get it and fix it up easily, but knowing me, I may be tempted to keep it once its done. I don't have one in a laquered brass yet :), only silverplates. Anyways, just posting here my thoughts...
 

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Buy it. The way things are going right now you're better off having objects than cash. Interest rates are effectively zero and the greed of our beloved oligarchs is about to set off an inflationary cycle that will make our heads spin. Plus, you know you want to. :bluewink:
 

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Ditto! IMO: get it if you have spare cash/time to invest in it...
 

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Wagspdx I wish you were wrong about the inflation thing but it appears to be true....the $1 pizza truck outside my apartment is now $1.50 a slice!! Anyhow, agreed that $100 for a saxophone like that is a good price and you might not be able to profit off of it but you certainly won't lose money.
 

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Yeah I think in the near future there might be a real run on C melody saxophones. May I suggest buying a case of those new curly Q light bulbs at the same time?
 

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Your Conn was originally silver (later stripped and lacquered) or originally bare brass. The lacquer finishes did not arrive until the early 1930s. The brass horns do sound a bit brighter, which will help your Conn. Good luck!!
 

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Your Conn was originally silver (later stripped and lacquered) or originally bare brass. The lacquer finishes did not arrive until the early 1930s. The brass horns do sound a bit brighter, which will help your Conn. Good luck!!
almost sertainly originally bare brass, then lacquered sometime later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok. I definitely have the ability to invest in it, and I will have time for another repad. The finish on it is actually nice in the pictures, the mechanisms are said to still feel oiled and smooth, although I am sure the pads are shot. I believe that I will invest in it, "sit" on it for a while after repadding, and think about selling it in the near future.

Oddly enough, the serial # begins with an "M" prefix which is said to mean 1969, although it was the owners grandfathers who had said it is a 1919, and it definitely is a "Wonder" split-bell C-Melody, I can tell that from the pictures. It is marked with the usual 1914 patent date and number, along with a "L" for LP and a "C" for C-Mel. I wonder what that "M" means?


Thank you everyone and cheers from Colorado
 

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As someone who always has far more project saxophones (and clarinets, flutes. fifes...) to trip over, than I could ever fix in my remaining lifetime, think on...

I have recently watched two C's that I bought/re-sold on ebay, sell (fixed up) for very little more than they sold for as projects ! All I can say is, do it mostly for pleasure, and you won't be disappointed.

I too was about to say that "original laquered brass finish" is a contradiction in terms, but a saxtet of others got in there first... If you are going to 'deal' in saxophones, you'll need to sharpen that eye.
 

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Also, why limit yourself to Conns?
As I understand it, your entire (albeit short) saxophone experience is based upon two Conns.
It would increase your spectrum, and experience, if you sought a "bargain" Buescher, King, or Martin. Who knows....you might even prefer them.
I was a confirmed Buescher person until I tried a Martin....the result of years of gentle persuasion by cmelodysax.
You, from what you tell us, are of the Rock/Blues persuasion....there is no better sax for that idiom than the Martin....now I am gently nagging. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
On Conns, the letter means the instrument.
M = Saxophone
N = Clarinet
O = Flute
D = French Horn
etc.
Interesting.... neither of my other Conn's have the prefix M on them, just the #. I wonder (no pun intended) why they would mark some with this code and not others...

And later on it designates 1969, strange...

Also, why limit yourself to Conns?
As I understand it, your entire (albeit short) saxophone experience is based upon two Conns.
It would increase your spectrum, and experience, if you sought a "bargain" Buescher, King, or Martin. Who knows....you might even prefer them.
I was a confirmed Buescher person until I tried a Martin....the result of years of gentle persuasion by cmelodysax.
You, from what you tell us, are of the Rock/Blues persuasion....there is no better sax for that idiom than the Martin....now I am gently nagging. :)
Aye, you are quite correct about my saxophone experience. I have played a number of other horns, but its regularly a Conn C. I love the Conn C's, they still fit quite nice in the Rock/Blues/Metal area... even a touch of Reggae and Rap. I feel that the increased bore sizes of the Martin and the King would be greatly appreciated. When I first saw the ad for this saxophone I was hoping it was anything but a Conn... but alas it is. I would love to restore a nice Martin or King...

Been eying that Martin on Ebay with a buy it now of 275, Nice serial # on the neck plug matching the body. Its out of the price range though for right now.... There are also some Martins there trying to sell at dramatically higher prices.

Presumably in the spare time between designing & making your revolutionary C sop.
This Conn actually plays in its current condition, I stopped by and tried it this morning! There is no question now that I am going to acquire it for a time being. Three Conn C's... oh my! :shock:

@ cmelodysax, sorry to hear that some horns you put time into didn't return that much back to you, but if you enjoy bringing them back and getting them into the hands of players then you have done great things :)
 

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@ cmelodysax, sorry to hear that some horns you put time into didn't return that much back to you, but if you enjoy bringing them back and getting them into the hands of players then you have done great things :)
Danny, I didn't lose any money on them, I'm just annoyed that the enthusiasts I sold them to (still as projects) literally flushed their own repair costs down the drain when they recently resold them at a low price.

That's not to say that I won't lose any money (or haven't, on others) it's the luck of the draw. In the 80's and 90's, when I forsook the lunacy of music for the much better paid lunacy of computer engineering, I spent some time on both East and West Coasts of your lovely USA - had I spent all my weekends there at yard sales and in pawn shops buying up vintage saxes, I could have been knee deep in valuable Mk VI's by now, bought for a fraction of their current worth - sigh :(

But then, I could also have bought up every single Lawton mouthpiece I came across in the UK in the 70's, and stashed them away, what an investment that would have been :lick: Hit it right and you're a winner, hit it wrong and you're a musical scrap yard. Such is life, eh ? Now I just buy what I either cannot resist, or know that I will enjoy, it's only money... Music lasts forever, money can be gone tomorrow [rolleyes]
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hit it right and you're a winner, hit it wrong and you're a musical scrap yard. Such is life, eh ? Now I just buy what I either cannot resist, or know that I will enjoy, it's only money... Music lasts forever, money can be gone tomorrow [rolleyes]
A wonderful outlook on music, money, life.... :)

I know what you mean about "cannot resist" haha, when I played that Conn this morning I knew that I would have to "inspect" it more carefully for a while... perhaps at some gigs?
 

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But then, I could also have bought up every single Lawton mouthpiece I came across in the UK in the 70's, and stashed them away, what an investment that would have been :lick: Hit it right and you're a winner, hit it wrong and you're a musical scrap yard. [rolleyes]
It pays not to dwell on the past...Yet I cannot forget that I was offered a pristine T35 Bugatti in 1961 for £495. The last one sold, a "well used" example, changed hands for £1.6 million.
I was aware that cars such as Zagato bodied Alfa Romeos & "Ulster" Aston Martins would, in the future, appreciate in value, but I was engaged in the far more important process of attaining Engineering Degrees!....Hey Ho.
Rest assured however that this steep market rise will never apply to Conn C tenors....break even at best.
 

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Oddly enough, the serial # begins with an "M" prefix which is said to mean 1969, although it was the owners grandfathers who had said it is a 1919, and it definitely is a "Wonder" split-bell C-Melody, I can tell that from the pictures. It is marked with the usual 1914 patent date and number, along with a "L" for LP and a "C" for C-Mel. I wonder what that "M" means?
Danny,
the last series of Conn C-melodies had the M before the serial number, and the G# key in the "nail file" stile. These are known as Chu-Berry model. I have one in silver plate. It's a good deal for $100.00 if it is in playing condition. The brass ones tend to get a little bit less money on sales, but it should be still worth at least $200.00.

Get it, play it for a while and then sell some Conns and get some from the other brands to try them out.
 

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Yes, the M before the numbers was not on the early horns. The 60s horns do add confusion but a look at the keywork will tell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yes, it did have the nail file G#.... wonderful! This means that I have a "Wonder", a "New Wonder", and now I am about to acquire a "New Wonder II" or "Chu Berry" C melodies. To me that is quite awesome to have progressing models like that. I may end up keeping this Conn for a matter of years and see about selling it in more favorable market conditions. At that point my C Sop should be done and I can get a Martin, King, and Buescher, and eventually maybe even a Holton. This particular Conn C was believed to be a 1919 because of the patent date, which had a smudge over the 4 making it look like a 9. According to the serial number, it is actually a 1926... more befitting of the Chu Era of horns. I will be interested to see what design improvements Conn made from the "New Wonder" to the Chu, and will post a similar report of my findings to the thread I did about the differences between a "Wonder" and a "New Wonder"

Cheers all, I pick up the horn in a few days I'll post some pics!
 
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