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Discussion Starter #1
After an extended layoff from the tenor sax due to numerous health related problems, I'm back in the B flat saddle. I'm happy with my progress except for the squeaking high G. This was a terrible problem for me when I first started playing tenor but eventually became a non issue. Unfortunately, I can't remember what I did to eliminate the problem. I suffer from CRS (Can't Remember Stuff) Right now I'm doing long tones on the high G and G sharp and if I slur into these notes, no problem. Any and all helpful tips will be greatly appreciated by this seasoned citizen.
 

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That you had the problem before and it worked itself out indicates its not going to be insurmountable this time.

Chirping on notes can be caused by a bone-dry reed, too stiff a reed for the player, or a mouthpiece not suited to the player's current embouchure. Poor ligature adjustment, that is both positioning and tightness, can also lead to chirping. Those are the easiest and least expensive causes to consider experimenting with to solve the problem.
 

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Oftentimes when a beginning player tongues a note they move too much of the tongue too far inside the mouth, or they will actually start the tone with the back of the tongue using a "guh" syllable. Both of these can force the high G up to the next harmonic which is high D---especially on tenor. There are two approaches I would recommend.

1) Work on playing a G scale tonguing 8 eighth notes on each step of the scale using a "tu" syllable focusing on moving just the end of the tongue the shortest distance possible until you can tongue high G with control.

2) Play high G as a long tone and raise the back of the tongue from an "AHH" position to an "EE" position while speeding up the air forcing the upper overtone to sound. When you learn the "voicing" to turn it on and off at will, the problem will be solved.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Horn is new and was just checked out by a tech with 50 years experience. He, and my former teacher said high G squeaking on a tenor is common among newbies. To me this is like going through puberty twice. :) Thank you all for responding. I WILL persevere and I WILL conquer this AGAIN. It's almost like a self fulfilling prophesy. If I "think" about screwing up on the G, I do. Thank you all for responding. extradarcafe, my tech said he hated the Cannonball mouthpiece and felt that was part of the problem. I have a Vandoren ordered. saxoclese, I tried both of your suggestions and the difference was good. Thanks again.
 

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It could be a pad(s). Just because no leaks appear with the leak light, doesn't mean it is not leaking. Does it squeak more as moisture builds up in the sax? Pads that look OK but have that used look will sometimes begin leaking when moist. This happened to me. Half my 2nd octave wouldn't play properly and no one could fix it. I spent nearly a year trying to find the solution. It got so I hated playing the sax. Then Matt Stohrer's video on pad research help me recognize what a bad pad could look like.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks luteman. I will check out Matt's videos.
 

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I just changed mouthpieces and saxes and am experiencing the same issue - something I have not had a problem with for a very long time. I went through the same thing a few years ago when I acquired a new sax. Made the dumb mistake of taking the new sax out of the packaging and going off to a gig with it. Lots of embarrassing G chirps and squeaks that night. I was able to fix it over a short period of time with practice. So it really may be just learning how to form your embouchure for your particular set-up.
 

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After an extended layoff from the tenor sax due to numerous health related problems, I'm back in the B flat saddle. I'm happy with my progress except for the squeaking high G. This was a terrible problem for me when I first started playing tenor but eventually became a non issue. Unfortunately, I can't remember what I did to eliminate the problem. I suffer from CRS (Can't Remember Stuff) Right now I'm doing long tones on the high G and G sharp and if I slur into these notes, no problem. Any and all helpful tips will be greatly appreciated by this seasoned citizen.
Ted,

I recall you previously commenting on the neck to body angle that you prefer. Please check to make sure the octave key is operating properly. Some horns are very sensitive to the rotation of the neck with respect to the horn because they are set up with very little play in the octave key.

G’luck on your tenor quest - it’s great to see you back on The Horn That Matters.
 

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Probably just a matter of rebuilding your embouchure. By High-G, I assume we are discussing G in the Altissimo, and not G right above the staff. For me personally, G has always been a bit of a funny note, always playing 10 cents sharp if I don’t make significant adjustments to my embouchure. The fact that yours squeaks, is not of surprise. I don’t know that I have much in the way of new perspective. Obvious culprits are:

1). Need to regrow your embouchure more. I have found that one quick way to accomplish this is to play a mouthpiece with a wider tip opening for a few weeks (maybe jump from a 60 to an 85, or 90 to 105). When you jump back to your original mouthpiece, everything will seem a lot smoother. (It is just like having a desire to play high-C with great tone. If you just practice high-C, you will never get there. Practice a few notes above it, like F, and all of a sudden your C sounds great). An alternative that might work is to move to a stiffer reed for a bit, and then soften it up again....though I find that moving back from a softer reed to a stiffer one causes me other problems.

2). Your reed manufacturer might not make the same quality reed that they used to make. Try a different brand. Also, I believe that stiffening up your reed (1/2 step) is likely to reduce squeaking. That has always been the case for me.

3). Try a different mouthpiece. I find I have problems doing altissimo in my vintage Gregory mouthpiece, but it is relatively easy on my D’Addario D8M and Vandoren T75. (My Gregory has a larger chamber and a smaller tip opening than the other two.)

4). Also, I am not clear as to whether you picked up your old horn and the tech said it was fine, or if you purchased a new horn, and the tech said it was fine. If you have a new horn, you might be using an incompatible mouthpiece....sometimes they just don’t match up.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Dr. G: I did check the angle and it's right in the sweet spot. I do appreciated the reminder. I NEED reminders.
Bjroosevelt:I just purchased the sax and took it straight from the music store to my independent tech. It's not a sax until he says it's a sax. My tech hated the mouthpiece that came with the sax and I had the opportunity to try a Vandoren today. It was love at first note and I now own it. Had a few sqauks today but way less than yesterday and not as severe. Thank you for your suggestions.
 
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