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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, need to see if I can repair this on my own. I just bought a used Reference 54 alto and I put it away for about 30 minutes after playing for an hour and a half. When I took it back out, all of the sudden, the G# key was staying up a bit all the time. This caused me to play an improper G in both registers and most of everything else around it is sharp.

From what I can tell it isn't a spring off, what else could it be?

I have a huge performance on Tuesday and I'm not sure my tech can get it done on time.

Thanks!
 

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There are two springs on the G# mech - one that powers the key cup (to lift it up) and one that powers the lever key (to close the key cup). If a spring has come off it will be the lever key spring.
If both springs appear to be in place (i.e. sitting in their respective spring cradles) then it may mean that the lever key spring has come loose in its pillar and has rotated.

However, you say that the G# key cup is staying up 'a bit'...which probably means that there's a problem with the regulation between the lever arm and the key cup.
Have a look at where the lever key arm meets the key cup arm - there should be a piece of cork or felt between the lever key arm and the pin attached to the key cup arm.
If this is missing then you'll need to have it replaced. In the meantime you could fix it temporarily by wrapping some sticking tape around the lever arm - just wrap it around until it's thick enough to close the key cup.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The cork is there, but it definitely seems like something with the lever key but I just don't know what.
 

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You might also check the following:

Press down on the low B key on the LH pinky table. There should be a very slight movement before it contacts the G# key and presses that open. Do the same test with the low C# key. It should have the same "lost motion" or "free play" as well before making contact with the G# key.

If either of the keys are touching the G# and making instant contact, there is a strong possibility that one or both of these keys is not allowing the G# to raise completely, which in turn means the lever from the G# isn't going down all the way to close the G# pad.

One way to fix this is to press your G# key all the way down, and then with your other hand press down very carefully on the lever that closes the G# key to bend it down ever so slightly. If done properly the G# will now close completely and the slight motion before the low C or B engages the G# will return. If you bent too far, simply use your finger or a popsicle stick as a lever and very carefully bend the lever up slightly.

You can check whether the G# lever is completely closing the G# pad by putting a leak light in the sax, or by simply pressing down on the G# key cup itself. If it doesn't go down any further, the problem has been corrected.
 

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Check the G# spring tensions are balanced properly - the G# lever spring should be much stronger than the G# pad cup spring for it to work properly as they're working against each other.
 

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Or the LH pallette keys have got bent putting it down on its side. If the C# is moved it'll hold the G# open.
 

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Check the bell isn't loose and the low B and Bb keyguard hasn't been bent in.

Also check the small sliding linkage pieces (they usually have a small piece of plastic tubing covering them) on the connecting arms of the G# and C# padcups aren't loose.
 
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