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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
I've just come back from a short break and found that the g# button on my 1938 Balanced Action won't return. From what I can see the spring appears to be in place. If anyone can help I'll be infinitely in their debt.
Cheers.
 

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Check to see if the G# key adjustment plates (I don't know what to call them. They're on the bottom of the G# key and they touch the low B and low C# key) are not hitting the low B or low C# table keys before the G# rests on the tone hole. Could be the G# lever arm has been bent. Post some pix and you'll probably get a quick response on what exactly is wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The pad and mechanism for the pad itself is fine. It's the actually key that sits above the B and C which stays back once pressed. Will send some pics now
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
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It's proving more difficult than expected to get a photo behind the key bank. Don't know how much this will help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Automotive lighting Amber Gas Auto part Metal The actual G# key which you press while playing doesn't move back to the original position like it should. The actual pad mechanism moves fine.
I think the spring is sitting in the correct position.

Apologies for the grubby state of the mechanism, the flash makes it looks so much worse!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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Sorry, for some reason this refused to attach before...
 

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Have you tried cleaning off the 'grubby' and putting some oil in there yet?
 

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View attachment 56358 The actual G# key which you press while playing doesn't move back to the original position like it should. The actual pad mechanism moves fine.
I think the spring is sitting in the correct position.

Apologies for the grubby state of the mechanism, the flash makes it looks so much worse!
Looks like That spring is on the wrong side. should be on the other side of the cradle and thats possibly why its not working correctly. look at this pic not quite the same mechanism but gives you the general idea of what side the spring should be latched.
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Turns out the springs were all in the right place, but there was some rust in the pin in the mechanism. Definitely in need of an overhaul asap! Thanks for all your help.
 

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Hi everyone,
I've just come back from a short break and found that the g# button on my 1938 Balanced Action won't return. From what I can see the spring appears to be in place. If anyone can help I'll be infinitely in their debt.
Cheers.
I had this problem on my SBA and tried lots of things that did not work. Turned out the associated rod had corroded. My tech guy made a new rod which solved the problem. I had him do the same for my other SBA which didn't have a problem, just to avoid a future one. Took a little more than an hour to make and replace the rod.
 

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Oil isn't just for lubrication any more! Yes, it's also a rust preventive.

If you have a Conn with the little set screws, every time you lube the mechanism put a little drop of oil on each of those little set screws, and you won't have to cut posts in half to get pivot screws out down the road.
 

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Well, 7 years too late, but I disagree with the original diagnosis in this thread. The key itself is simply binding on the other spatula keys and just needed to be bent upwards a little so it clears the other keys. No amount of oil would have fixed it.

In the later poster's case, a slightly corroded rod can usually just be cleaned up rather than replaced. This is easy to do yourself and is absolutely free.
 

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Well, 7 years too late, but I disagree with the original diagnosis in this thread. The key itself is simply binding on the other spatula keys and just needed to be bent upwards a little so it clears the other keys. No amount of oil would have fixed it.

In the later poster's case, a slightly corroded rod can usually just be cleaned up rather than replaced. This is easy to do yourself and is absolutely free.
This was substantially corroded.
 
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