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Hi. It didn't look like a sticky key pad problem. An hour into practice my G# hole cap remains open though the G# key has not been pressed. When I pressed the G# key, the cap moved a little and it didn't sound like G#. After cleaning and drying it, it went back to normal - the hole cap remains closed till I pressed the G# key.
What has happened to my instrument. Please advise. Thks.
 

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One of the low keys (I think it's "C") will cause the key to open. Check to see that that low key is working properly and not causing the G# key to open.
 

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I am not an expert. Two obvious candidates:

1). You have a spring that is messed up (not engaged or too weak)
2). You have dirty/rusty rods/mechanisms which are preventing proper rotation (opening and closure) of the keys when depressed and released. (Cleaning or oil would help)

Or a combination of the two.

......you could also have some bent keywork somewhere.
 

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I had the same thing happen, on my King Cleveland tenor, a few weeks ago, after having wiped down my horn the night before. I couldn't see anything obvious, but I thought I must've snagged the cloth on a spring, or something. My tech took a look at it, and fiddled around with it for about a minute and handed it back to me, stating "the key was bent." I no longer wipe down my horns, in between the rods. Lesson learned.
 

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- The G# "touch" on modern instruments has two "tabs" that extend from the bottom. This creates what is called an "articulated G#" whereby pressing the low B or low C# key touch contacts these "tabs" so the G# key will also open if none of the keys on the right hand stack are closed.

- What happens sometimes is the low B or low Bb key cups are prevented from opening fully usually because the key guard has been bent down. This in turn presses the tab on the G# touch opening the G# pad when you don't want it to.

- What you need to check is to make sure there is a bit of "lost motion" on both the low C# touch, and the low B touch before it contacts the tab on the G# touch. If there is not, one or both of the bell keys needs to be raised either by straightening the bent keyguard or by backing out the adjustable bumper. A less likely scenario is that the problem is the low C# touch is too low. This is a more complicated issue and should be dealt with by a professional tech. Removing the felt on the tab that the low C# touch presses might buy you some time before you have to take it in.
 

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Thanks for the explanation, Sax. I hate when my tech fixes something I couldn't find, in less than a minute, and I never find out what it was. I could ask, but I hate to take up any more of the guy's time when he was nice enough to stop what he was doing, to take care of me.......at no charge.
 
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