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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm not sure if this has been answered before but I couldn't find anything about it on a search.

So I have a Conn new wonder I, and I love it to death. But my tech is a pretty decent drive from my house, so I was wondering if I coudl find a solution I can do myself.

Now onto the issue, the G# key on this sax seems a bit sluggish, it feels like it's moving slowly, and when the pad hits the hole, it feels dull. My Yamaha's G# key on the otherhand, feels very crisp, and i know when I hit the tonehole. Where as on this Conn, it feels dull and slow, and I'm not exactly sure when I hit the tonehole until the pinky won't go down any further.

I don't know if that makes much sense. But If anyone undersatnds what I mean, is there a quick fix to make the G# key feel more defined and have the levering movement more defined and crisp?

I have a feeling it has something to do with the spring, but I'm not exactly sure what to do.

Thanks for any help, if what I said isn't clear just say it, and I'll try to clarify it some more.
 

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Detach the spring and move the key up and down with your fingers. If it moves up and down freely, bend the spring forward slightly and hook it back onto the key. If the key doesn't move freely, hangs open, feels sluggish when you move it without the spring, take it to a tec as the key is binding and not working properly. This could be from a few things:

-The key is bent
-The rod is bent
-Dried up/gummy oil on the rod sticking to the key
-Body bend that pinches the posts together

If it's not the spring it could be a whole other set of problems, so try to figure out if it is the spring or not and act accordingly.
 

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Could be the tensions on the G# lever and the G# key are not properly balanced. Also, often times there is a rather thin piece of cork on the slider area where the lever and the key meet. We use a strip of teflon in this area, but often there is cork. Could be the cork is dirty/gummy, or most likely "dented" in a manner where the keys meet that will not allow proper fluidity in the mechanism. Rusted/gummy key rods, bent posts, etc. are amongst a few of a vast assortment of possibilities. Should be a quick diagnosis and fairly easy fix for a tech.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
yeah, the only real problem is that I just very very recently got this sax serviced, about a month ago. And I noticed it when I test played it at the store, but it didn't bother me that much while I played it there. But now this is kinda becoming an annoyance since it's seemingly harder to pretty the G# key, and is difficult for playing fast passages.
 

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Can you please check this: Hold the G# lever, that is the what you press with your pinky to play G#, and then with your other hand press the G# key, this is the part with a pad on it, back and forth. Is it sluggish? Then hold the G# key closed, and press the G# lever back and forth. Is this sluggish?
If only one of these feels sluggish then you at least know which one it is now. If both feel sluggish, then it's both. If none of them seperately feel sluggish then it is almost certainly like Jerry said too much friction between the key and lever most likely because of bad choice of material there.
 

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Check and make sure that the screw is not coming out of the post for the G# key. I was having "sluggish G#" problems and that turned out to be the solution. Took the tech 3 seconds and he didn't even charge me.
 

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Take a clean drinking straw from your favorite fast-food restaurant and cut a strip about 3" long and 1/4" wide from it and slide it in between where the keys meet. Try the key action then. This should answer your question. (Note: The 3" strip is only to make it easier to handle/install and then remove it, for this experiment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hello, clarnibass I did just do the test, and its the G# lever that the pink presses that is actually slower, the actual pad is very quick and responsive.

PC1234, I just checked the screws and they are all securely fastened.

As for the lever connection material, there is cork used there. But it really just seems like its the G# lever side spring, its very large, and not very springy, it seems like it would be awfully stiff considering it's size. whereas the spring in the G# pad side is about half its size and is much more springy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Is this a job that an inexperienced DIYer can do? Or would you recommend this as being a techs only job
 

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Good test description, Clarnibass.

"As for the lever connection material, there is cork used there."
Natural cork is not really suitable, especially if it is thick, although it is used by most manufacturers. Once it has a deep dent in it, that dent interferes with the transfer of force. This may be compounding your problem.

"It's definitely the balance then. The G# lever spring needs re-tensioned/increased most likely."

Or the Key's spring needs lightening up.

Kaplac, it can be a lot more complicated than this.

It can involve the geometry of that linkage. Ideally, when the key is closed, the contact point between the key and the lever, should lie in the plane containing the axes of the hinges of both keys. Some saxes have really poor design in this respect.

Also, your tech could have adjusted the respective travel of the key and the lever, to deal with a different issue. If this is done by moving the contact point between the lever and the key, closer to the hinge of the key, it results in the lever having less leverage over the action of the key.

Accurate diagnosis must precede an effective solution.
 
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