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I've been given a funk solo at the last concert my school is having this year, but I don't listen to any, nor do I relly have much of an idea of funk soloing. What are some reccomendations for a beginner funk soloist? What are some CD's with easier to follow solos that I could follow and get ideas from?

Thanks,
-Scott
 

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Get your Hands on some Tower of Power ASAP

Lenny Pickett, Skip Mesquite, et al are all great in funk stying
 

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What kind of funk tune are you going to play?

A good place to start to get into the world of funk would be with Maceo Parker, probably any of his recordings would be great inspiration, I particularly like "Mo Roots". Maceo used to play the alto with James Brown, and he is definitely among the top funk saxophonist.
 

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sonnymobleytrane said:
Wilton Felder
Definitely. Eddie Harris, too.
 

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hakukani said:
Definitely. Eddie Harris, too.
I definitely agree with Hakukani. Eddie Harris is fantastic! Make sure to check out "Listen here" - really funky tune... Also, the album "all the way live" with Eddie Harris + Jimmy Smith is great throughout, although the tune "Eight counts for Rita" from that album may be particularly funky, IMHO...
 

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bjornblomberg said:
I definitely agree with Hakukani. Eddie Harris is fantastic! Make sure to check out "Listen here" - really funky tune... Also, the album "all the way live" with Eddie Harris + Jimmy Smith is great throughout, although the tune "Eight counts for Rita" from that album may be particularly funky, IMHO...
The best part of funk is the notes you DON't play. Eddie doesn't play them at the best possible moment.:)
 

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Yes, that is true :)

Some others were masters of that as well. It may be a distraction, but it reminds me of something I read elsewhere on this forum: when Coltrane asked how he could improve his solos, Miles supposedly told him "try to take the horn out of your mouth..."
 

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all great suggestions....but for techinical simplicity, maybe Maceo is the best way to go. I guess you would need to look at your own strengths as a player and decide which player would be best to imitate.

Maceo is quite rhythmic....
 

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Yeah man, Maceo will teach you more about Funk in a few minutes of his playing than anything else...'quite rhythmic'!? COMPLETELY RHYTHMIC - find a track where Maceo makes a single note into an epic 5 minute Solo that stands up next to anything the other greats come up with! (I'm a fan as you can tell!)

Stevie Wonder once said something along the lines of 'if Maceo isn'tin the Groove, then there is no groove' -

Also try this book that I have had published for over a year now, Berklee are using it now which is cool. Its a load of Funk Riffs with a backing CD, written to help improve your solong ability specifically in a Funk style...

https://www.adgproductions.com/ssl/productdetails.asp?moveto=13&searchFor=woodwinds+saxophone TENOR

https://www.adgproductions.com/ssl/productdetails.asp?moveto=14&searchFor=woodwinds+saxophone ALTO


check out my website if you get a minute www.btompsett.com
 

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well i would say you need to hear a lot of james brown or the the J.Bs. Maceo Parker is also great. I have my own funk band and its all about groove.

i recomend ( apart from the ones mentioned ) : Parliament Funkadelic ( Maceo Parker recorded in some albums by the way ) Joshua Redman, Kenny Garret, Bob Mintzer maybe
 

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Heres my advice. Think of soul and funk playing as being short catchy licks that have a beginning and an ending within a listeners attention span. Use Blues Scales and Minor Pent and think about syncopating the rhythm often. Another player said to leave space. This is also very important. Think about playing a riff, then imagine in your head leaving a small space for an imaginary answer to your phrase, then re-answer it etc. Also go listen to Maceo Parker on a song like Pass the Peas or anything off Life On Planet Groove.
 

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yeah that album is so damn funky. i would recomend transcribing the solo of shake evrything youve got, its the sexiest solo ever.
 

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I think there is no doubt about Maceo being the funkiest among the well-known alto players. But, who would be the most funky tenor player on the planet? I think my vote would go to Eddie Harris...
 

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Try Herbie hancock...i think thats how you spell it lol...anyway pick up a copy of his albums. Look around for different versions of chameleon and maybe watermelon man(i cna't spell worth crap) I got a few ideas from those songs.
 

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Maceo sure does it for me.
Now, if I could only steal a killer band like his.
 

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Eddie Lockjaw Davis. The funkiest saxophonist ever.
 
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