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hey people
funk i a very favorite style for me and i rellay want to know how to play funk vibes with my alto , if someone do know about some funk riffs or can show or explain
with Chords ?
thx
 

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You can pretty much learn all there is to learn about funk alto by listening to Maceo Parker. I particularly like his solo on "Make my Funk the P-Funk" by Parliament, and pretty much everything on "Life on Planet Groove", which, if memory serves, also featured Candy Dulfur (who is a stone cold fox, btw ;)).
 

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Funk uses a lot of dominant 9 chords. Mixolydian and blues scale oriented stuff works great. There is definitely a funk "language," and knowing the scales is less than half the battle. The important thing is to listen to the masters and learn the stuff you like.
 

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Here are some guys to check out if you want to learn how to play funk, and don't forget that Google and Youtube are your friends:

Maceo Parker
Lenny Pickett
Dave Sanborn
Michael Brecker
Benny Maupin
Bob Mintzer

A lot of the greatest funk players over the years have been great jazz players, too. The crossover is immense, and because of that there's a rich funk influx in jazz and a ton of jazz in funk. You're going to find that learning about each style will show you things about the other, too.
 

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Funk uses a lot of dominant 9 chords. Mixolydian and blues scale oriented stuff works great. There is definitely a funk "language," and knowing the scales is less than half the battle. The important thing is to listen to the masters and learn the stuff you like.
Besides the salami in the shoe trick which I have used before :bluewink: I use pentatonics and dominant 9's as well.

Articulation and timing is important.

Listen to the recommended players already listed plus:
Sam Kininger of the band Soullive
Jeff Coffin of DMB and Bela/Flecktones
Karl Densen of KDTU and Greyboy Allstars
Eddie Harris with John Scofield
Joshua Redman's Elastic band period
Tevet Sela

Enjoy bringing the funk.

B
 

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I was hoping that someone would mention at least Karl Denson. I got to see him live in Tahoe at the Crystal Bay Club. It was a great show.
 

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I always think of the "funk chord" as being a Dominant 7#9 in which case, the best option is probably a minor pentatonic or blues scale.
 

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In my ears, Maceo Parker is the purest funk player ever.
Any other important players I know have either strong jazz or afrobeat or other influences in their playing. Of course, even in Maceos playing you can find traces of jazz, blues, old time R'n'B....but that's just the nature of funk and Maceos playing is as congruent with my concept of funk as it gets. A lot of the other funky players out there and listed here never or almost never got as funky as Maceo in my ears. It's not a weakness on their sides but rather a question of: "What do I like and what do I want to sound like?".

If you lean towards a pure, raw funk style that doesn't sound too jazzy, I would keep one thing in mind: Rhythm is all. Your articulation, syncopation and rhythmic flow is all that makes it funky. Plus: simplicity. Not too many notes, but the right notes played at the right time. Stick to the blues scale and chromatic passing notes SOLELY and you are bound to sound more funky than someone playing a mixolydian with the 2nd and the 6th note. Maceo Parker said about Funk: "It's not about what you play, it's about what you don't play." And he couldn't be more right. Picture yourself a burning bee and play that way. Leave away important notes and emphasise those you usually wouldn't. And, last but not least: be able to play every 16th note in the whole measure with every kind of articulation there is, if needed.

Addition: if I had to start with funk, I would pick one note, and play that note only for a whole lot of time until I can really groove with it using different articulations and fresh rhythmic ideas. Also: try playing very loud to get rid of any kind of hesitation.

Addition 2: I consider false fingerings and slap tonguing the funkiest effects. Maceo uses false fingerings (including the use of overtones, e.g. alternating the normal c#2 fingering with the c#1 fingering while still playing c#2) a lot. You can get a really percussive, bouncy feeling with those techniques. Think of your sax as a snaredrum with your tongue being the stick and your fingers alternating the pitch.
 

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i think i would have to agree very much with ismail. i also feel that for funk, when you start playing lengthy and notey phrases, your venturing more into the jazz, afrobeat, or whatever else styles there are. simplicity goes a long way in funk. i also think about james brown as well. although he was a vocalist, it was the same concept. he sang the right things at the right time and new when to drop out.

also, another thing that ive been working on a lot recently is playing loud, as ismail pointed out. it really does help in making your playing "believable" to the audience. if your playing sounds like you believe in it, the audience will too, and thats one thing that makes a musician great no matter what style you play.

edit:
i think im gonna try and play an entire solo using 1 or 2 notes. i really wanna test the waters with this and see how much energy i can build off of 1 or 2 notes.
 

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With funk it ain't what you play, it's when you play. Funk lives in the rests.
 

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With funk it ain't what you play, it's when you play. Funk lives in the rests.
i wish there was a "like" button because i wanna like your comment...wait...i do! :)
 

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I believe Maceo also said, "We like to do 2% jazz, and 98% funky stuff." So if my calculations are correct...it equals out to "Less is more." :)
 

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Funk can be played over a lot of different types of chords. Regardless of what the chords are though the scale is usually minor pentatonic. Get that Ultimate Funk Grooves book and play a long CD and have a blast!
 

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If you want to add a more modern style (think Dangelo 1995) add the b9 as a tension to the root. Add major 3 as tension to the minor 3 add the major 7 to b7 as tension release. but as others have said think rhythm. What would make you want to dance?? I dance on the floor as I play funk, If I cant feel it, nobody else will. K
 
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