Sax on the Web Forum banner

21 - 40 of 41 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2008
Joined
·
4,046 Posts
I have one slightly longer than the other as well. Be very careful about getting your teeth ground down. The enamel, once gone through the teeth tend to wear quickly. Of course if it's an extreme case than you might have to do it.

I went for years by splitting a tooth patch in half, centering it on the mouthpiece for the side that had the shorter tooth. It works pretty well.

I noticed the longer tooth much more when I was using a metal mouthpiece with it's flatter tooth plate. I've since switched back to hard rubber mouthpieces and those seem to compensate for the longer tooth much better because the beak profile is rounder, especially on Selmer hard rubber mouthpieces. I prefer not to use a patch, but do on occasion use some electrical tape.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member.
Joined
·
8,485 Posts
I've had a few mouthpieces, a couple of hard rubber (Selmer, Link) and a couple of metal (Larsen, Link) and the tooth has always eventually made adjustments to the mouthpiece.

I've never used a mouthpiece pad because I don't know what is in the adhesive. It could be very benign, but I play sax for a living, and it is in my mouth almost every day. I'd hate to find out 20 years later that there was something slightly harmful that builds up in one's system. Especially for something that I feel isn't necessary or that helpful.

It's the same reason I quit using plasticover reeds. I noticed when they were new, they made my tongue a little numb, and when the plastic started flaking off, I figured I was ingesting the same stuff that made my tongue numb.

Insights and incites by Notes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
803 Posts
I used to have this condition also, until one day about 7 years ago while I was golfing. Took a ball square in the teeth (full 5-iron from about about 30 feet) from one of the guys in my group - he hit the ball sideways!!!

Anyways, it hit me square in the mouth - knocked out 3 teeth, front, incisor and bottom. I had oral surgery for 2 implants and a crown. I asked the guy to make my front two as even as possible just to help with the sax, and he did a pretty good job.

I'm actually lucky the ball hit me in the teeth, anywhere else may have killed me or done some serious damage to my eyesight. But, I wouldn't recommend this procedure just to even up your teeth, I just got lucky. ;)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member.
Joined
·
8,485 Posts
<...> But, I wouldn't recommend this procedure just to even up your teeth, I just got lucky. ;)
Remember folks, dave2sax is a trained professional. Don't try this at home!!!

;)

Notes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,524 Posts
I've done just as heath for fixing this problem. I'm in braces currently (at 24 years old, about to start my Doctorate no less!), and as things straighten out, I've come to find my left front is a bit longer. Having slightly more mouthpiece patch on one side fixes the problem for now, until I have them reshaped post-braces. In fact, just last night I sat down with all my mouthpieces and remade all the patches. Should be good for a while :)

Steve P
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2008
Joined
·
4,046 Posts
I had braces as well, but sadly the longer tooth once I finally stopped wearing the retainer began to settle back a little.

Depending how much room and what your teeth are like you can expect your teeth to shift for years/decades after the braces come off.

Might a recommend a dental water pik since your wearing braces. I use one now and it's drastically improved my gum health(no more bleeding gums at the dentist). It's tough flossing with braces as much as you should.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,524 Posts
Heath,
Yes, from what I understand teeth can sometimes move post-braces. My ortho has already mentioned using a permanent retainer on me to fight that.

Already have a water pick. It's great! Flossing is a pain with the railroad tracks, that is for sure...

Still, even at 23, in the midst of my MM, and about to start my DMA, getting braces was one of the best decisions I have made. My playing, or rather, my sound, keeps getting better and better.

Steve P
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2008
Joined
·
4,046 Posts
Yeah I had crooked bottom teeth that bothered me before my braces. My bottom teeth are very even and smooth now. It's been a god send since I had braces. It was tough to avoid the hamburger lip with one of my bottom teeth sticking out supporting the reed.

Personally I had the permant retainer on the back of my bottom teeth, but it actually made it tough to clean and as a result I'd have tarter buildup back there. Kind of caused my gum line to receed in the back because the plaque was irritating the gums. Anyway it's been years since I got that retainer off, no more plague, easy flossing, and luckily the bottom teeth have stayed put.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I wish to learn to play the saxophone.
I have "buck teeth", with my front 2 teeth slightly protruding out.
Will this hinder my playing in any way?
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
29,528 Posts
It shouldn't hinder your playing provided they are set firmly in your gums. We encourage people not to bite too hard, so if you do it right all should be well, however it is worth discussing with your dentist and a teacher. Make sure you get a teacher who is very experienced as they will probably have come across the situation before and give you the best assessment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
I also had one tooth a little longer than the other, and both pretty sharp. I would easily wear grooves into mouthpieces and go through patches pretty quick. Last year I asked my dentist if she could do something. She busted out the dremel (dental version) with sandpaper attachment and leveled them and dulled them up a bit. It didn't take much and didn't hurt at all. Now, my patches last a long time. I use a clear (harder one) over a black one which seems good. I've yet to unleash my teeth on a bare mpc. What the dentist did was basically what I would have done with a dremel. The advantage is they can see in your mouth better and they probably know when to stop. I wouldn't hesitate, just ask your dentist about it. Don't do it yourself :)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
28,553 Posts
I also had one tooth a little longer than the other, and both pretty sharp. I would easily wear grooves into mouthpieces and go through patches pretty quick. Last year I asked my dentist if she could do something. She busted out the dremel (dental version) with sandpaper attachment and leveled them and dulled them up a bit. It didn't take much and didn't hurt at all. Now, my patches last a long time. I use a clear (harder one) over a black one which seems good. I've yet to unleash my teeth on a bare mpc. What the dentist did was basically what I would have done with a dremel. The advantage is they can see in your mouth better and they probably know when to stop. I wouldn't hesitate, just ask your dentist about it. Don't do it yourself :)
Personally I would not have chosen to go that route, stayed with the patches. The reason being the teeth wear down(quite a bit) over time. Sometime down the road you might not have enough enamel, have overly sensitive teeth and pain.

Hope it works out for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
Regarding this thread .. I have a left front tooth that digs through mouthpiece patches after a few days ... chipped, a bit sharp with a jagged edge .. each of my new mpc's gets a toothmark within a few days ..as DanPerez says ... just one of those things ...
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
28,553 Posts
Regarding this thread .. I have a left front tooth that digs through mouthpiece patches after a few days ... chipped, a bit sharp with a jagged edge .. each of my new mpc's gets a toothmark within a few days ..as DanPerez says ... just one of those things ...
Use maybe a mpc "pad"? It's like a patch but much thicker; you probably can get varying thicknesses as well, like the patches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
I already use an mpc pad ...thought i put that in the post ...after a few days I am through the pad though .... i get the .o8's .... I don't mind the thickness and have been thinking of doubling up with a smaller one on the top just to get more life out of them ...
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
28,553 Posts
I already use an mpc pad ...thought i put that in the post ...after a few days I am through the pad though .... i get the .o8's .... I don't mind the thickness and have been thinking of doubling up with a smaller one on the top just to get more life out of them ...
No, you stated patch(es). Maybe I'm wrong but I think there's a difference between patches and pad; the pad's thicker?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
One of my front teeth is longer than the other and I just realized it really affects my tone.

I've been working on loosening my embouchure, but it seemed to make my palm notes squeal uncontrollably. I saw a mention in a google search that uneven front teeth could cause this problem (because the reed gets pinched on one side) so tried only contacting the mouthpiece with one of my front teeth. This immediately solved the problem and made the horn easier to play across its whole range. My tone improved as well. I ended up playing in either the left or right half of my mouth - either way worked well since only one of my front teeth touched the mouthpiece. I'll give the suggestion to put a mouthpiece patch on only side a try.
 
21 - 40 of 41 Posts
Top