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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFywB4O6WVY&t=40m05s

At the 40m 12s mark, EG hits what I believe a split front E to get a multiphonic, or is it something else? Is there another multiphonic fingering, or is he growling the E?

Whilst I can get many multiphonics on tenor, I can't seem to get this on that front/top E. Alto, yes for this, but tenor....

Any suggestions, one and all?
 

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It's done by playing a fork E and aiming your air down as if you were trying to play a second octave G. You need more air support, though. Make sure to keep an open throat.

There's a neo-classical piece for Tenor titlled, "Tenor Excursions," that is great for starting multiphonics on Tenor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
saxyjare01 - thanks for replying.

Yep, as suspected it's a front E (fork E as you say). Am capable of various multiphonics on both alto and tenor, it's just THIS one on tenor (I can get it on alto) is proving to be a challenge. Some involve more throat opening than others, some a tighter/more relaxed embouchure and so on. But this one, damn it's got me stumped :)
 

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Can you better define what a 'split front E' is? Anyway, it does sound like the Sanborn split tone but I believe there is some growl in it too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Can you better define what a 'split front E' is? Anyway, it does sound like the Sanborn split tone but I believe there is some growl in it too.
Yes, sorry, it's using the front fork E fingering and splitting the note intentionally to achieve a multiphonic, a la Sanborn as you say.
 

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saxyjare01 - thanks for replying.

Yep, as suspected it's a front E (fork E as you say). Am capable of various multiphonics on both alto and tenor, it's just THIS one on tenor (I can get it on alto) is proving to be a challenge. Some involve more throat opening than others, some a tighter/more relaxed embouchure and so on. But this one, damn it's got me stumped :)
Try it without the octave key.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Success... I dug out some scribblings made years ago for split notes for alto, and one of them works. Hit the fork E, with octave key, but add right hand 1,2,3 and bottom C.

Thanks guys, we got there in the end.
 

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Okay, I guess what I don't know is what is fork E? Does it involve the front F?
 

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I'll have to try that out. This is an example of why I'm always recommending players to get a teacher - development is accelerated by many times. I never heard of a 'fork E' in over 60 years of playing, but I can see how it could come into play.
 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFywB4O6WVY&t=40m05s

At the 40m 12s mark, EG hits what I believe a split front E to get a multiphonic, or is it something else? Is there another multiphonic fingering, or is he growling the E?

Whilst I can get many multiphonics on tenor, I can't seem to get this on that front/top E. Alto, yes for this, but tenor....

Any suggestions, one and all?
Euge Groove is simply doing the Flutter Tongue Technique on that high E with an added growl. Here is a quick video explaining how.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hI9u9wHGm7M
 

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Euge Groove is simply doing the Flutter Tongue Technique on that high E ..
+1. That's what it sounds like to me. In any case you can get that sound with flutter tongue even when playing the standard fingering for that high E. A split tone or multiphonic is a bit different sound.
 

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I think of a real high E harmonic as sounding like Trane’s on Harmonique from Coltrane Jazz. It’s incorporated in both the melody and his solo, most notably on the last note of the tune. You can get it by fingering A2 and adding the E palm key at the same time. I think the Euge Groove clip is flutter tonguing, which I can’t do to save my life!
 

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Yeah agree using the fork E and focussing your airstream downwards. Probably a good thing to practice doing is splitting notes from front E upwards into the altissimo as well as playing them dead clean. If at any point you get into multiphonics, check out the saxophone multiphonics book by Daniel Kientzy called Les Sons Multiples Aux Saxophones. It’s very very good even though there is the odd inconsistency


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Advice so far.
1. Try "whistling" it down.
2. using the fork E and focusing your air stream downwards.
3. Practice the Flutter Tongue Technique.
 

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Haha oh no, really flutter tonguing?! Surely just growl for a better effect than flutter tonguing.
In that clip he may have been doing a bit of a growl also, but the primary effect I hear is flutter tonguing. As to which effect is "better" that's a matter of taste, and also how the player handles it. Both effects can be altered to some extent, especially the flutter tongue. It's possible to back off a bit on it and make it more or less subtle depending on the effect you want. Also, just like altissimo and multiphonics, a little bit goes a long ways. Best not to overuse it.
 
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