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Me and my friend are in high school and he always tells me that whenever he practices past like 8:00 he gets in trouble and has to stop. I tell him to play quieter but he says that he still gets in trouble, any advice for my friend?
 

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Maybe he can play at your house, practice together? If he could get a bunch of packing blankets or something on the walls he might be able to quiet down his room or play in a closet or basement. Else just practice earlier... Maybe not too helpful but where there's a will there's a way. Driving age? Find somewhere to drive to and practice outside. Maybe not in winter... I've done pretty much all the above:)
 

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Thank you, I will try to update this thread with how it goes.
 

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Me and my friend are in high school and he always tells me that whenever he practices past like 8:00 he gets in trouble and has to stop. I tell him to play quieter but he says that he still gets in trouble, any advice for my friend?
Sure. Don't practice after 8:00.

Don't you have other homework to do in the evening?

Next?
 

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Sure. Don't practice after 8:00.

Don't you have other homework to do in the evening?

Next?
I was thinking the same thing... but I sure hate to discourage a guy if he wants to play so badly... which is rare and can be the beginning of great success if not discouraged. The sad problem is that "success" is far more elusive in this day and age, and "other homework" is probably the only reliable meal ticket for most all of us, even with huge talent.
If the dude really is this dedicated, encourage him to play his chops off. Unfortunately that just won't be possible at his house after 8 (without some creative soundproofing). So tell him to stay dedicated and fill the after-school hours and weekends with practice, or come to your place, etc.
Another thought is an electric keyboard (headphone-capable)... since piano proficiency and the mastery of theory that it promotes are essential for any serious musician. Devoting the "after hours" sessions to that could help him as much or more than playing the sax every night.
Just a few of the many other things he can do:
Transcribing... solos and things. Learn the flute (pick up a good student Yamaha, cheap! - perfect to learn on). LISTEN to great players... as essential as practicing... so many great recordings out there! Reading biographies of great players, interviews with great players. Watching youtube videos of saxophone lessons, master classes, etc. Breathing exercises (Get the book Song and Wind by Arnold Jacobs!). Trying his hand at arranging for small or even larger groups (he oughta be playing with groups, too, and preferably not just in school). If there's a college or large city nearby, finding older players to get together with (don't be shy!)...
Stan Getz's neighbors when he was a kid in NYC hated him and told him "Shaddup ovah there ya stinkin *&#%^!". But his mother would yell up and down the alleyway "Play loudah, Stanley! Play LOUDAH!!!". Eventually, he dropped out of high school, went on the road with many bands, and made a massive fortune playing the sax. But I'm not sure if maybe that was a different time and Stan Getz was maybe a really special bunch of guys... Who knows?
 

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Looking back, I don't know how my parents (and siblings) put up with my piano playing in h.s. Same things over and over trying to get it right. Day after day. Would have driven me nuts were I not the one playing...

Good luck with your friend:)
 

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I wasn’t allowed to make a peep at home as a kid. It was frustrating and I carry it with me still. I have a really difficult time practicing at home even when no one is here.
 

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Looking back, I don't know how my parents (and siblings) put up with my piano playing in h.s. Same things over and over trying to get it right. Day after day. Would have driven me nuts were I not the one playing...

Good luck with your friend:)
I, too, was blessed with an accepting family. First with the clarinet, then saxophone, bassoon... and then the first few years of discovering electric guitar. :shock:

It is good for me to reflect on that, and to try to be as patient with my kids as they explore their interests.

Thank the gods that neither has shown any interest in playing trumpet. :twisted: :bluewink:
 

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Me and my friend are in high school and he always tells me that whenever he practices past like 8:00 he gets in trouble and has to stop. I tell him to play quieter but he says that he still gets in trouble, any advice for my friend?
Practice earlier. When I was a young-un, I practiced (required by parents) after dinner. Homework was expected to be completed immediately after school.
 

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Practice earlier. When I was a young-un, I practiced (required by parents) after dinner. Homework was expected to be completed immediately after school.
That really is it. It's different for those working an 8 to 5 job with a commute tacked on either end. If school is out at 3pm, there are several hours of opportunity before 8pm.
 

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This is all true, although I have to admit when I was in school...I always wanted to get the sh#tty homework out of the way earlier in the afternoon, so I could enjoy practicing more later on. Just made it more enjoyable and flowing not having to think about the homework which had yet to be done....

But, yeah...if your (OP's) buddy can't do that, or prefers not to, I think the idea of practicing at your (OP's) house is a good one.

Then the other suggestions of opening a discussion with the family about possible creating a sound-dampening space to practice in is also a good one. Doesn't need to be large at all, and it isn't very expensive to buy the DIY materials to convert a small space in such a manner.
 
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