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Short answer - every time you hear the pitch change, the reed frequency changes.

I'm not sure humans have the ability to "feel" small frequency changes with any degree of accuracy with any other organ besides their ears. In other words, if you were deaf, would you still be able to feel different pitches unless they were really far apart?
 

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Not so sure about that. I play long tones with my foot on an organ bass pedal and can feel the pulse difference all the way up my leg on each interval just as much if not more than I can being conducted through my teeth or my ears, and actually the closer interval is in relation to the drone the harder the pulse is felt. I also used to DJ dances at the school for the deaf when I was in high school and learned that a lot of severely hearing impaired people can play the interval game if the source is loud enough. We'd wear big industrial ear protection because the music was cranked and speakers faced the floor.
I agree. I mentioned small differences and accuracy since everybody can probably feel the differences between high and low frequencies, but would be unable to identify specific pitches. I don't think I could identify an E versus F with my foot. But I could probably tell one is higher than the other.

When the OP said he couldn't feel differences, I'm just suggesting it's going to be hard to differentiate the frequency difference between say E and F by feel alone. But he should definitely be able to feel the difference between low Bb and high F. If that's not happening, something is seriously wrong somewhere.

Along that same line, I do use feel along with sound to approximate perfect pitch. If I imagine myself playing a G with on my tenor, part of that memory is the vibration felt under my fingers. All that information together enables me to accurately recall the pitch as concert F.
 
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