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I think that there is a general consensus that rhythm is the basic basis of improvisation. At the same time, improvisation is closely related to dance and native speech, which allows them to be used at the beginning stage of improvisation learning - in the form of a verbal and dance monologue and dialogue ; prior improvisation on instrument. However, the following question appears: who has experience using freestyle rap for this purpose?

BTW, why there is no rap in 4/4 swing feel?
 

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Have you ever heard of Rahsaan Roland Kirk? He did many raps over a beat that was more or less 4/4 swing. For example "The Old Rugged Cross". Don't forget "Big Bad John" or "Five Feet High and Rising".
 

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Not sure if you've listened to Kendrick Lamar's amazing album "To Pimp A Butterfly," but the track "For Free?" is essentially Kendrick blazing over an extremely swinging jazz quartet. Pretty sure it's Terrace Martin, Robert Glasper, Ronald Bruner, and some badass LA bassist, I would imagine. (The song is most definitely NSFW so don't put it on at the office. Or around your young children. Etc.)

One of my very favorite musicians on any instrument is... Busta Rhymes. Anyone who's ready to dismiss rap and hip-hop as non-music needs to listen to his breakthrough 1990s albums before doing so. He's actually been a huge influence on me as an improviser, and the same goes for my good friend Matt Muehling, a phenomenal guitarist (and co-founder of my band, Progger -- we bonded over Busta long before forming a group together).

Robert "Sput" Searight is a phenomenal jazz drummer (with the likes of Snarky Puppy, Ghost Note, and lots of other projects) but he also has a storied career working with artists like Snoop Dogg and Erykah Badu. He says that playing with Busta Rhymes was one of the best musical experiences of his life, and that when Busta freestyles he improvises like a jazz musician and can handle all the crazy rhythmic information Sput could throw at him.

Hip-hop and jazz are very closely connected, exemplified today by people like Terrace Martin and Kendrick Lamar, and I'm sorry to break that to you rap-haters. Well, not really. :) <3
 

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Not sure if you've listened to Kendrick Lamar's amazing album "To Pimp A Butterfly," but the track "For Free?" is essentially Kendrick blazing over an extremely swinging jazz quartet.
Thanks for the tip, HeavyWeather! There is rhythmic conformity only in the first two bars - 0:49; further it goes simply polymetric counterpoint. The groove of rap, apparently, fundamentally contradicts the walking feel. Something similar I found in music of griots:


However, my main question is about using rap in the process of developing improvisation skills.
 
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