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SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
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I like, and use, enclosures a lot. And your example is a very cool sound. One 4-note enclosure I like could be called a 'double chromatic approach', targeting a chord tone by bracketing it chromatically with 2 notes ascending chromatically from below, followed by 2 chromatic notes descending from above, to finally arrive at the chord tone. And man, that sounds complicated and convoluted! But it's actually very simple. So if the target note is F:

Play Eb - E (from below) G - Gb (from above) - F. If I knew how to put music notation on here it would be more clear.

As to nomenclature, I like the term 'enclosure' because it's fairly descriptive. I've also heard them called 'encircling tones', which pretty much says the same thing. A more generic, less specific term would be 'embellishment', but of course that includes a lot of other types of embellishment (approach notes, passing tones, etc).

Bottom line, I like your term 'four note enclosure'. I knew right away what you meant and this type of enclosure isn't discussed as much as it's deserved, which is why I clicked on this thread.
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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The alto player in the vid used something I like - repeating figures, ala Earl Bostic. Most players these days are too stupid to allow themselves to do such a thing - they think they're 'above' repeating anything or even playing 'figures' in the first place. Funny, you don't ever hear anything about those guys. :)
 

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Enclosures help put the Zig -Zag in Bebop lines. I use enclosures to make the bebop sing. I put words to enclosures and make them "Sing Da Bebop". Enclosures are great in jazz music. You use them very well.
 
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