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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
IVE been recording gigs and I'd like to be less bright. I think the mic accentuates that on overdrive. I'm considering a LD M94 as an alternative. I'd hate to lose walking the crowd but tone is everything K
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
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No, I always have my transmitter volume set to about 11 o clock on the dial. My gain is always lower than the vocalists on the mixing board as well. Just a good amount of monitor, level and some EQ.
 

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SOTW Columnist/ Forum Contributor 2014, Disti
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The 98 can be a "hot" bright sounding mic. I have been using it for over 20 years. I really like it. I have adjusted the gain on the body packs for the alto and the tenor with each gain being a little different then I use the "EQ" on the mixer to balance the highs (brighness) depending on the location of the gig. I do not use the 98 all night. And the mixing board gain is also a little under the vocals most of the time. I believe your mixing board adjustments will possibly help a lot. What size PA speakers are you using?
 

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I guess it depends a bit on the transmitter as well. I'm using a BLX1 /4 combo and for the Shure98 I am usually setting it to ~ 1 o'clock. I have some other mics that I have to dial down to 8:30
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Im not talking about the board. On the battery part of the mic you have three gain settings. I have always used it on the highest? I think the middle if flat and low takes off some decibels.? K
 

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Im not talking about the board. On the battery part of the mic you have three gain settings. I have always used it on the highest? I think the middle if flat and low takes off some decibels.? K
Keith, if this is the one you are talking about: http://www.shure.com/americas/products/microphones/beta/wb98hc-wireless-instrument-microphone , it plugs into several different body packs, and some may have 3 settings, some have a clock dial. Rule of thumb is that you dial in the supply voltage to the microphone and thereby you change the sensitivity. Different microphones will have different sensitivity ranges, so if you run a different microphone over the same body pack, you may have to change your dial/setting to adjust for it. In other words, your thinking is correct in that the middle setting may be considered the base line, and then you can boost the signal or you can decrease it. It should have little impact on the frequency response of the microphone but the lower frequencies of your horn may have more energy and that's why you may perceive the low setting as darker.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay , I get it now. my bat pack could be used for several models of shure 98s. Mine has a thing on the left hand side and it has a + --- and _ so boost I guess. I ordered an LD M 94 to check out. If it sounds better I can live without the wireless aspect K
Keith, if this is the one you are talking about: http://www.shure.com/americas/products/microphones/beta/wb98hc-wireless-instrument-microphone , it plugs into several different body packs, and some may have 3 settings, some have a clock dial. Rule of thumb is that you dial in the supply voltage to the microphone and thereby you change the sensitivity. Different microphones will have different sensitivity ranges, so if you run a different microphone over the same body pack, you may have to change your dial/setting to adjust for it. In other words, your thinking is correct in that the middle setting may be considered the base line, and then you can boost the signal or you can decrease it. It should have little impact on the frequency response of the microphone but the lower frequencies of your horn may have more energy and that's why you may perceive the low setting as darker.
 

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SOTW Columnist/ Forum Contributor 2014, Disti
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Hey Keith, I noticed that you state On the battery part of the mic you have three gain settings. I have an old system with only 1 gain knob on the side of the BP so my suggestions may not apply.

You might want to contact Shure. They are very helpful. I remember calling them in the early years and the rep said that it is a trial and error situation on adjusting the gain on the bodypack and the board (mixer) to set the volume and EQ. It is a balancing act but once it is set you will be good to go as long as you use that same mixer and mixer gain setting.

As Shure indicated, each sax and each sax player will have some different adjustments due to the ranges of the horns (alto/teonr/bari/soprano) and the players style (loud/laid back) so I bought two bodypacks and two mics. One unit for each horn. I walked away from the PA and adjusted the volume on both alto and tenor BP to get the correct balance on each horn and keep the same BP and mic on that sax.

The reason that I asked about the PA speakers is that they can also determine (to a degree) your sound/tone as in 10", 12" or 15".
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2017
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Yes they are bright...They are good mics though. Robust and clean.

Send the hottest signal you can (without distortion / clipping) to the FOH and let them compensate with EQ at the board....OR.... Use a stage monitoring system that has EQ (Such as a keyboard amp) and EQ prior to your line out to the FOH.
 
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