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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I use a Rode M3 (sweet as!) but a bit over-sensitive. Have tried clip-ons, but so far haven't used one sounding anything as rich as a good fixed mic. I don't make much money from gigging so there's a limit to what I can spend on mics.

I like to have plenty of reverb and plenty of foldback volume.Typically the engineer gets it almost right during soundcheck, but when the band gets hot the feedback sneaks out and bites!

Been thinking about the spacial relationship of my mic when playing tenor and the foldback wedge. There must be an ideal way to set up, avoiding feedback, but I clearly don't know it.

Has anyone out there got photos which might help me? Words of wisdom?
 

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I don't know what a rode M3 is, but in the first place you must use a unidirectional mic. Over here you can't beat the standards of the live music industry, Shure Mics. I've been using a Beta 57 for quite awhile. Second, you basically can't have reverb in your stage monitor - the feedback situation just won't allow it. I'm rather surprised you haven't been told off by the sound man yet. Third, floor monitors just don't work very well. They blast a lot of noise into your work space but you still can't tell what you're doing. I have gone through various methods in looking for that great stage sound, including carrying my own rig which consisted of a tiny powered mixer, a rack-mounted effects box, a small monitor wedge and a direct box for sending my mixed signal to the board (front of house). In the end, it has come down to using a simple clear plastic sound reflector that attaches to the mic stand. What you hear is what you play - no EQ, no effects. If you heard it, you did it. Out front, I make sure the tones are set right and I, like you, want that deep reverb. You have to be firm about the reverb - they will say its too much because they can hear it - well, duh, listen to any record and you can hear it too. They use it to make the record sound good so people will buy it - so you want to have that live.
 

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Lose the reverb in the monitor first off. The monitor is a tool for your reference. It is not a complete representation of what is going out front. Careful eq of the monitor should give you what you want. If you have the same eq structure and effects out front and in the monitor, that will be a source of constant problems.

Your description indicates that the gain on your mic may be too high. If you gain is too high, the mic will pick up other stuff on stage and create a feedback problem. You need to be right on the mic in high sound pressure situations to reduce bleed-through.
 

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There are a few ways to avoid feedback.

1. Lower stage volume (good luck)
2. Get closer to the mic
3. Make sure that you're on axis with the mic, and the monitor is off axis.
4. Move the monitor closer to your ear.
5. Put in a slight (5ms or so) delay going to the monitor
6. Use an equalizer (parametric is best) to get rid of the offending feedback frequency. A notch filter will be less obtrusive.

In your case, I'd probably lose the condenser mic and the reverb.
 

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Yup. The m3 is a great mic especially for acoustic guitar. And for the price an awesome allround mic in the studio. Not a favorite live though.
I would go with a shure beta58. or if money is tight buy a used sm57 pull out the transformer if you want to get fancy.
Otherwise as hakukani said. Loose fx in the monitor and try to find the freq who sets of the feedback. As a rule of thumb you can ditch everything under 200k or even 300k you'll get a pretty nasal and midrangy sound on stage but without feedback.

Or a third option is buying your own in-ear system. every soundguy knows how to hook you up. Without the monitor - no feedback.
 

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Lotta good advice in this thread
 

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I also get the sense from your post that you're keeping a distance between your horn and the mic. Unfortunately live playing in an environment with any significant volume requires you to get right up on the mic with your horn.
One "side effect" of using the sound back reflector monitor, for me, is that it has trained me to be more consistently on the mic.

To be honest though, I've never had my floor monitor feedback through my stand mic. Must be on pretty loud for that to happen?
 

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I also get the sense from your post that you're keeping a distance between your horn and the mic. Unfortunately live playing in an environment with any significant volume requires you to get right up on the mic with your horn.
True, but if you're lucky enough to play in a band that actually uses some dynamics, you can 'work the mic' by backing up or moving forward for some dynamic control. That's one of the advantages of a stand mic. But only if the band isn't playing full-blast the whole time!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The M3 has a -10db & -20db pad switch. Try the -10db pad.
Was wondering about that. Will try that immediately as I really like my Rode: amazingly lush sound.

Sounds from a number of suggestions that I'd be better off with a Shure in terms of safe micing.

The reverb through the foldback was my idea the other night: terrible result - agreed to by inexperienved engineer. Never again!

And will try to work out how to best configure off-axis. Do actually work pretty close to the mic: have to to be heard!

Thanks to everyone.
 

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My axe had tell tale scratches inside the bell from the previous owner burying the mic in the bell of the horn... I've added a few more. Battle scars?!
 

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Sounds from a number of suggestions that I'd be better off with a Shure in terms of safe micing..
No, it doesn't have to be a Shure mic, necessarily. We're suggesting a dynamic mic; many brands of dynamic mics are available, depending on what you want to spend.
 

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A used sm57 can be had really cheap. And if you know anything about soldering. I would suggest removing the transformer. And wire the capsule straight to the xlr-connector. You'll loose around 10dB but the frequency response can't be compared to the stock version. You'll get a sound closer to a sm7. All registers sounds more natural and not as scooped.
 

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The M3 has a -10db & -20db pad switch. Try the -10db pad.
The pad is to make sure that you're not overloading the mic at the front end. It won't help feedback issues, unless you're overloading the internal mic pre with your sax.. (Yes, condenser mikes have a preamp inside them)
 

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1saxman has it right. I bought a monitor and a clip on mic(atm350). Used them twice and could never hear myself. Ended up selling the clip on mic and bought a Sennheiser e835, a mic stand and a soundback reflector. Works MUCH better and the Senn mic sounds way better than the ATM350.
 
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