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I have bought Fobes Debuts with a combination Legere/Fibacell to test it on my Yamaha 2II Bass clarinet. Do you think this would be a good setup.

Would this set-up give a easier get clarion register sing out easier? Or any hints for me?

thanks.
 

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Re: Fobes Debuts... any commnet?

I've just started playing the bass clarinet (a Yamaha 221-II) and was advised to obtain a good mouthpiece. I started out using a Forbes Debut with Rico Royal 2½'s and in about two weeks I'd moved up to a Legere 3¼, the same strength I use on soprano clarinet. I think it's a great combination and has made the clarion register much more secure. The Debut gets lots of good reviews, by the way; I don't think I'll be looking elsewhere for a long time.
 

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Re: Fobes Debuts... any commnet?

Fobes Debut's a great mouthpiece. I use one as a backup for a Fobes professional model. Try it with a Vandoren or Gonzalez #3 or 3 1/2. It takes time to make the clarion "sing-out" on any setup. Lots of long tones!
 

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Re: Fobes Debuts... any commnet?

Fobes Debut's a great mouthpiece. I use one as a backup for a Fobes professional model. Try it with a Vandoren or Gonzalez #3 or 3 1/2. It takes time to make the clarion "sing-out" on any setup. Lots of long tones!
what is the different between Debut and Professional model (only) in the view of making the clarion "sing-out"?
 

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Re: Fobes Debuts... any commnet?

A pro Fobes mouthpiece might help you create a tone you prefer, or it might not. It's possible but doubtful it will make the clarion respond significantly (or at all) better. I play a Fobes pro model because this is what I like (have tried a gazzillion mouthpieces), but would have no problem playing the entirely range freely on any decent (and even some not so decent) mouthpiece. I get a tone and response of the entire range that I like with this mouthpiece.
 

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Re: Fobes Debuts... any commnet?

If money is a prob (they are 40 dollars) I recommend that to my students. If they can kick back 80 or so we go for the Vandoran M 15. K
 

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Honestly, Fobes Debut is overall a fantastic bargain. I often throw one on when teaching. Every time I play it I end up thinking that I could easily play it at a gig. They play that well.
 

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I've heard only good things about Fobes Debut. For the price, it's worth a try.

My bass clarinet mouthpiece of choice is a Grabner LB. With this set up (see Signature below) I'm often asked what kind of WOOD bass clarinet I'm playing. The quality of sound is that good with a Grabner LB on a Yamaha 221 II.

As a simple thing, I've found that using both a strap and the peg helps to give one more physical control of the instrument. It's espcially helpful in the upper clarion.

Roger
 

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Roger, do you find yourself exerting downward pressure on the beak? I notice that my mouthpiece tends to angle downward, opening a bit at the top of the tenon. This doesn't cause any problems but I wondered if it's normal. And you're right, peg and strap makes it easier to hold and move — especially when I have to shift position to see around the neck. Unfortunately the changes between bari and bass clarinet for this pit gig just come too quickly to fiddle with two clips and I'm just using the peg for now.
 

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Hi Shotgun,

No, I don't find myself exerting downward pressure on the beak.

Something that I've done that is of great help to me in doubling -- espcially, with quick horn changes -- is to use a double-lip embouchure on all of my reed instruments. It's been my experience that double-lip reduces embouchure shock in going from a larger horn with a more relaxed embouchure to Bb clarinet with a more firm embouchure....and the other way around.

I first started working with double-lip on bass clarinet and I quickly discovered that it helped to give me a bigger and more resonant sound. It's my impression that double-lip is used more by bass clarinetists than soprano clarinetists. Having great success with it on bass clarinet, I then converted to it on saxophone with equally good results. The last instrument was Bb clarinet. Frankly, it took me much longer to become comfortable with double-lip on Bb clarinet. Now, I'm so used to it on my horns that I would not dream of going back to single-lip. Harold Wright is one of my clarinet heroes. It's my understanding that he used double-lip.

I'm NOT suggesting that others do what I've done. Just sharing this as information.

Roger
 

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I notice that my mouthpiece tends to angle downward, opening a bit at the top of the tenon. This doesn't cause any problems but I wondered if it's normal.
If it doesn't cause any problems, no problem :) But this is either from too much pressure by the player or the fit of the mouthpiece tenon to the socket is not great (or both). Maybe even just the cork is a bit loose, or the tenon itself. If it's just very little, maybe no need to do anything. If it's more than very little, it can feel loose and uncomfortable and sometimes even cause leaks (in extreme cases).

Definitely worth trying the strap along with the peg, when playing sitting. If I haven't tried it I wouldn't find I don't like to use a strap at all when sitting, just the peg :) I know others who prefer both.

Re the Yamaha 221 sounding like a wood carinet, I found that it sounds better than several wood clarinets I've tried over the years, regardless of mouthpiece.
 

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Loved what you said about the 221 sounding better than several wood clarinets you've tried! I'm very impressed with the 221 II. I figured that I don't play bass clarinet gigs enough to justify a high-end bass clarinet. I heard from other bass clarinet friends that the 221 II is well constructed and rugged. So, overall, I had the impression that the 221 II would be just what I needed for doubling gigs. Since getting my 221 II around 3 or 4 years ago I've been quite happy with it and often receive positive comments about its quality of sound.

I've had equally good results with Yamaha flutes. I'm thinking that if anything happened to my beloved Couesnon Monopole Bb clarinet I'd probably get a high-end Yamaha...probably the CSV. Clearly, Yamaha makes superb instruments.

Roger
 
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