Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A trumpet player in my band really wants to get a flugelhorn, but he's on a tight budget. Are there any flugels under $1000 that are worth buying, or is he better off holding out until he can afford something more?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member and Forum Contributor
Joined
·
4,379 Posts
Sounds like he's looking for a "frugalhorn".
Sorry. I couldn't resist.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
32,949 Posts
Best to look in the trumpet pages for FAQs on buying flugelhorn - bottom line is same as here, know your market and watch for a good used horn.

R' - good 'un. ;)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
844 Posts
Bought a new Jupiter flugerlhorn for right at about $1000 a few years back. Prices have probably gone up quite a bit since then. :(
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2008,
Joined
·
3,891 Posts
A pretty good flug for a low price, look for a Used Yamaha 631 or 731, both of those play pretty well, if you're thinkin a larger bore flugel, and they've got a pretty nice price tag

you can usually find a Cousenon or a Courtois at a decent price used, for the small bore style

Just keep looking for something you like!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
When time comes to expand your knowledge of the market, Hub van Laar is something to remember. He's got a used Yamaha 631 on his site also. European prices though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Hi there,

(I am a trumpet player myself, and will start out on tenor sax soon)

Personally, I would also recommend the Jupiter and Yamaha brands. The Yamaha horns are really good in my opinion, although I do not feel that the Jupiter horns have the right 'flugel-core' sound - it depens on how picky your friend are - i know that I am...

The Cortouis horns are really exellent in quality, and the Couesnons are classic horns for soloists. The Couesnons tend to be hard to play since they vary a lot in pitch on the horns.

You could always post a question in the trumpetherald forum - http://www.trumpetherald.com

- I know that you will get a lot of helpful answers there.

I hope that your friend finds a good horn.

Good luck,

Peace,

Michael
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
watch ebay like a hawk.
i actually got my flugelhorn on facebook marketplace...
some kid sold it to me for 200 bucks.
It's a yamaha...plays great!
a bargain I couldn't have afforded to pass up.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,001 Posts
I bought my flugelhorn in 1967 new for $250. Six years later I bought my Bach Strad trumpet new for $350. That shows you the inflation. Today the Bach Strad sells for about $1800. I don't know the brand of my flugelhorn though a name on the bell says "Reynolds". Pricewise it was a medium-good quality horn. I had a lot of trouble learning to play it in tune. That may be because of the mouthpiece - a Martin. I tried playing it with various bands in which I played trumpet or trombone. But people always said it was out of tune. It doesn't have many tuning adjustments. The point is I thought I got a cheap one that was the cause of tuning issues. But that does not seem to be the case. The flugelhorn is the oldest of my horns now but looks the best. Today you have a much larger choice in horns. I'd suggest a well-known brand such as Conn or Bach but the Jupiter and Blessing Artist models look nice for decent prices. If I were to buy one today, I'd get a Conn Vintage One Professional based only on the Conn reputation.

Dr G gave the best advice as usual. Get to know the market.

Today, after learning to play the soprano sax, I can appreciate the flugelhorn and will play it more when I get new valve springs. The sop has the same tuning issues as the flugel horn.

Don't get one unless you have a very well-trained ear. About the time you get one or two of those, you'll start losing your hearing. (That's an occupational hazard.) The flugelhorn sounds great when played by an experienced player. So does the sop. They are both horns you must work very hard to play in tune.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
Joined
·
7,110 Posts
Wonder if it used to be worse yet. Years ago I interviewed Clark Terry. He said he had gotten interested in the horn in the late 1950s and that very few were available, and none could be played in good tune. He worked with (I believe) Selmer to redesign the flugel to play better.

Interestingly, this was about the same time Lucky Thompson and Steve Lacy picked up the sopsax. Perhaps it was caused by big bands finally going under for the 3rd time* - giving musicians the free time to spend with extraneous instruments.

*First they dropped off the record charts - then TV killed ballroom dancing - then rock broke big.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Tom's comments really hit home. Flugelhorn is my main instrument, followed by soprano sax. I guess I couldn't have chosen two horns more difficult to play in tune!
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top