Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,959 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there!
I play tenor and I recently switched to a Guardala MBII (refaced by Dave Jary) from a Florida Otto Link 6... I like the Guardala a lot more, because it suits my style a lot better and gives me a more modern, bright sound.
But that's besides the point. I still love my Florida Link because of the dark, Dexter-like tone quality it gives me. Anyways, recently, disaster struck and my Florida Link ran into contact with some sandpaper (long, tragic story...), and it went from the most beautifully dark and lush (with the ability to scream) mouthpiece to, quite frankly, a piece of crap. It's breaking my heart. I attached a sample of how it sounds now... Horrible, isn't it? Is there anything I can do to fix it so that it almost resembles the way it played before? Or will I have to get a mouthpiece refacer to fix it for me? Or will I have to get a new piece altogether?
Any help at all is appreciated...
Thanks,
Craig
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,959 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Oh, and one more quick detail, I tried to undo the damage by taking some very fine sandpaper (my dad told me it was 250 (or something close to that) grade) and a perfectly flat piece of glass and running the mouthpiece over it... I read online somewhere that that's what I'm supposed to do... But apparently it didn't work :/
 

·
Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
13,167 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,959 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Mind if I ask what possessed you do mess with it in the first place?
Hahahahahahahahahaha I find it laughable that you'd even THINK I'd be dumb enough to just mess with it on purpose. it was a freak accident and I tried to buff out the scratches. I didn't know the sandpaper was too harsh (220 is a pretty fine grain).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,325 Posts
Oh wow, 220 is a pretty harsh grain. Fine grain to me is 1500-2000. I've used sandpaper to make the insides smooth, but at the very lowest I'd use 800 grit since I didn't want to screw up the sound. Didn't hear any difference, just looked spiffier, hah.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,875 Posts
Oh wow, 220 is a pretty harsh grain. Fine grain to me is 1500-2000. I've used sandpaper to make the insides smooth, but at the very lowest I'd use 800 grit since I didn't want to screw up the sound. Didn't hear any difference, just looked spiffier, hah.
Technically, 220 is classified as "Very Fine". Going from coarsest to finest it goes Extra Coarse, Coarse, Medium, Fine, Very Fine, Extra Fine, Super Fine, Ultra Fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
713 Posts
That might be true for sanding a coffee table, but this is a mouthpiece.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,875 Posts
That might be true for sanding a coffee table, but this is a mouthpiece.
That's just how they classify sandpaper grit. The names are actually meaningless. I don't know what grit a refacer would use or even if they would use sandpaper at all.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2011-2015
Joined
·
2,048 Posts
220 sandpaper and mouthpieces don't go together very well. The coarsest I would use is 400 and as the work goes more subtle last touches do with 1200. Send it to a reface artist. It may sound even better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
As Steve Neff said, don't do any more to that piece yourself, you'll only make it worse. Send it to one of the refacers mentioned. I have two pieces with Erik G at the moment, old Links, and I trust him implicitly, his work is superb. I've also had refacing work done by Phil Engleman, and I have one of his pieces for alto, his work is superb also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,325 Posts
Technically, 220 is classified as "Very Fine". Going from coarsest to finest it goes Extra Coarse, Coarse, Medium, Fine, Very Fine, Extra Fine, Super Fine, Ultra Fine.
Technically there is no defined classification. You'll see one 3M 220 grit sandpaper package that say "Fine" and another "Very Fine." Plus, classification means nothing as to whether it's suitable for mouthpiece work. Relative to mouthpiece work, 220 is very coarse. Doesn't matter if it says "super duper ultra fine" on the packaging. Anything lower than 800 grit is likely to just create more problems if not an experienced refacer.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top