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So twice I've had notes in the first octave that start breaking into the next ocatave, (G1, F#1, D1). And twice I've fixed it by going after the reed. After playing the reed for 15 minutes, I take it off and shave down the table. I also hit the middle of the reed on the flat side where it could bulge a bit. This is simple and may be useful for this problem. Anyone else experienced this?
 

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Generally low register notes jumping into the upper register is usually a sign of a leak in the horn, so nothing to do with reeds. OTOH, a bad reed can cause all kinds of problems. But if this problem persists, I'd take the horn into my tech asap. Maybe you can adjust a reed to the point it helps you overcome that leak, but that's not a good solution.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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If the table has got swollen, the result IME is bad response, stuffy sound not squeaks. JL is correct it's most likely a leak. Could be anywhere.

It could very well the neck octave key is bent. There should be the teeniest bit of play before the post/pin engages on the neck octave key loop. (can't remember the exact technical term)
 

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Generally low register notes jumping into the upper register is usually a sign of a leak in the horn, so nothing to do with reeds. OTOH, a bad reed can cause all kinds of problems. But if this problem persists, I'd take the horn into my tech asap. Maybe you can adjust a reed to the point it helps you overcome that leak, but that's not a good solution.
+1+1+1!
Or it could be embouchure, eg a tight-lower-lip clarinet embouchure.
 

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So twice I've had notes in the first octave that start breaking into the next ocatave, (G1, F#1, D1). And twice I've fixed it by going after the reed. After playing the reed for 15 minutes, I take it off and shave down the table. I also hit the middle of the reed on the flat side where it could bulge a bit. This is simple and may be useful for this problem. Anyone else experienced this?
Sometimes that can happen from a octave key that is a little off center or doesn't shut fully. Those notes all jump up with the body octave key so next time it happens maybe take a look at that. The body octave key on my alto sticks a lot. I also sometimes have issues on my soprano because the palm key screw come out as I play over time and when they get to a certain point the key is off center and doesn't shut completely and notes jump like the octave key is open.
 

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After making sure the sax is working properly I would go right to "pilot error" as the cause. One can "voice" any note in the lower octave and make it sound an octave higher. The hard part is getting it to do that only when you want it to. Air speed, shape of the oral cavity, tongue position---all of these can have an influence over whether the sound wave is vibrating in mode one, or mode two---not to mention the firmness of the embouchure. My favorite expression for this I got from a french horn player. That is you need to learn the "taste" of each note.
 
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