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So I'm playing this funk chart in my jazz band and my section leader gave me the chord changes for the a solo and I have no idea what to do or what notes to play for the chord, the chord is G#mi7/C# and the price we are playing is in the key of A, I could really use the help
 

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notes in the chord should be G# B D# F#, so all of those notes are "safe" to play. You can also try D# F# A# and C# for some more "advanced" stuff.

If you're playing funk, think more rhythmic and angular movement. Listen to lots of Maceo Parker.
 

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Sax players who are learning to improvise tend to give less thought than they should to what rhythms they are playing. So it will probably help if you get a recording of the song to play along with, and try to build phrases at least two measures long (even longer is better) where you are just playing one pitch, and where you are making it interesting by telling a story based on rhythm. What would a drummer play, if they were playing a drum solo, instead of you playing your sax solo?

Keep in mind that the audience listening to you is more likely to forgive and forget a note you play with the wrong pitch, and less likely to overlook a note you played at the wrong time.

Another tendency of those learning to improvise is that they think they need to play more notes than they actually do. Space between phrases is your friend.

While there is some technical stuff you will need to learn, such as which notes are in the chord, and which pitches are in the scale or key of the chord, remember that a good solo is like a conversation. In a conversation, using less words is often more effective than using more words, and your phrase #2 should sound like you know what the phrase #1 preceding it was (whether you or an accompanist played phrase #1).
 

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Yes...+1 to working with a recording of the changes. You can record them on a guitar / piano whatever. Maybe just find a play-along track. Run it about 1000 times. Experiment - You'll come up with something. It's not improv if we tell you what to play. And the next time somebody tosses you a solo in that key - You'll already have some ammo...Good luck.

PS. The melody is a good place to start...
 

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Sax players who are learning to improvise tend to give less thought than they should to what rhythms they are playing..[edit]..try to build phrases at least two measures long (even longer is better) where you are just playing one pitch, and where you are making it interesting by telling a story based on rhythm. What would a drummer play, if they were playing a drum solo, instead of you playing your sax solo?
OH YEAH!!!

Some of my most well received and complimented solos were ones with the fewest notes. One of the musicians I respect the most LOVES when I play "1 note" solos, it's all about placement and variation.
 
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