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As of 9:45 AM March 2, 2011, I, Brian Matney, have played all 48 Ferling Etudes to my teacher's approval. Oh what a glorious day this shall be!
 

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Don't know yet. She said I could have a week off of etudes. As far as solos go, I'm working on the 2nd movement of the Muczynski Sonata. Then potentially starting some C-Melody work.
 

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A little longer than I would have preferred. 3 Years. Haha, She wouldn't let me pass off the last one till it was perfect, so I was on it for 3 weeks.
 

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Hate to bring this up--but you know that the Mule edition (pub. Leduc) has 12 more, for a total of 60? Mule composed the additional etudes to cover the enharmonic keys of Gb/eb, C#/a#, and Cb/ab.
 

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Haha. Oh no, not more! Eh, whatever it takes for me to get better. I need to get more comfortable with the tougher keys anyway.
 

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Haha. Oh no, not more! Eh, whatever it takes for me to get better. I need to get more comfortable with the tougher keys anyway.
I found the Mule additions quite nice for learning to read in odd keys. Now I can suck in Gb as much as I suck in F#...
 

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A good (though too often neglected) etude book I went through alongside the Ferling 48's is the Rascher 24 Intermezzi. Good musical workout as much as it is a technical one, and it's great for working on your duple vs. triple subdivisions. As you progress through the book, Rascher gradually takes away expressive markings in the hopes that you'll apply what you learned in earlier etudes. I think they are back in print.
 

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I think 24 Intermezzi is a good book to follow up to Ferling. I'm currently playing out of Londeix's "Nouvelles Etudes Variees Pour Saxophone." If you're comfortable in exploring the altissimo ranges then this is another great choice IMO.

My professor told me a funny story about the whole "you're never finished with Ferling." He was attending FSU for a Master's in Performance at the time Elliot Riley was also there. For his last lesson, Prof. Meigan told Riley to play a couple Ferling etudes and his response to my professor was "Man, you know he's just having me play these so I can play it and he can make a lot of comments on my musicality."

It's true, you are never finished with Ferling etudes and IMO, they are some of the best, if not the best studies we have. Each time I play a Ferling I already played in my lessons just for fun, I can always find a new take or approach on it.
 

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After finishing the Ferling Etudes, while they're still relatively fresh in your mind, it would be wise to work out the slow etudes 8va.
 

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After finishing the Ferling Etudes, while they're still relatively fresh in your mind, it would be wise to work out the slow etudes 8va.
Great idea, Angel! I'll have to give that a try. I've personally been revisiting all of the Ferling etudes and playing them with the piano accompaniment CD that comes with the Daniel Schmidt edition. The accompaniments not only make playing the etudes more fun, but also allow you to hear the harmonic progressions easily.
 

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You're never done with Ferling. Try playing them backwards; it will blow your mind.

- Saxaholic
 
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