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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking for some help on this sequence of notes from the bridge of "swing 42":

A#, B ,C# ,D#, B ,C# ,D# ,F..........the part that gets me is the D# to the B....right now I'm playing it starting off with R B.....is there any alternate fingerings for the B or D#?

Thanks!
Zack
 

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What octave are you in as I'm not familiar with this particular piece of music?
If you are over the break there is only 1 fingering for the D# unless you have a clarinet with the extra key in the left hand pinky cluster.
As for B and C#.... You can find these fingerings and their alternates on any basic clarinet fingering chart.
If you don't have one handy, and can't find one online let me know your email and I will send you one of my favourite ones for beginning clarinetists. It's VERY easy to read. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
over the break. it's a django tune. the 1 D# is the part that's getting me hung up as it forces me to play the R B.
 

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Right hand B is easy. You should be practicing your chromatics using alternate fingerings as part of your warm up.
That way when you run into situations like this your fingers won't go into panic mode.
Be thankful you aren't using an old Albert system clarinet. No alternates for B or C#.
 

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You can slide left hand B to C#. Sometimes you gotta slide or switch pinkies.
Whenever possible, you always want to alternate pinkies. If you have to slide, make sure it's absolutely necessary--don't do it because you haven't learned to play it right. In the long run, that'll only slow you down, especially when sight-reading. Assuming all the notes in the passage you're looking at are around the middle of the staff, you're probably stuck with a slide, and in general I tend to prefer one across my right hand over one on the left, as I'm right-handed. I'd say try them both and see which works better for you.

As for practicing, I usually start with scales and arpeggios in ugly keys--the Klose scale exercises are great for that. And if you get sick of that, learn a few bebop heads on clarinet. They're GREAT for technique...

Oh, and have fun! :mrgreen:
 

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Sounds like the best answer in this case is to slide from B-C# on the left hand. Use a little nose grease on your pinky and that should help. If you're like me with long pinkies, you can also try to flatten your left pinky down from the B to the C#. hitting the C# with the B will still sound the C#, because the B lever doesn't force close the C# tonehole.

Hope that helps!
 

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Slide from D# to B. In the days before LH E flat keys were common, it was a basic technique. It's more secure than a LH slide at a fast tempo. It'll take some practice, though. Keep the pinky a bit pointed and maintain pressure as you slide. Nose grease helps.
 

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If you REALLY want to avoid these nasty situations you can always trade your current clarinet plus a lot of other dollars for one that has the alternate Eb/Ab key.
It sure makes life easier.
I never thought that I would use the one on my Signature but I was very wrong. It sure saves your butt when playing in 5 sharps!
 

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I don't agree with some of the generalizations like "should" and "always"...

Anyway... if the first B playing with right pinky is a problem, you have a few options (depending on tempo, what transition specifically is difficult, etc.):
1) Practice the right pinky B more.
2) Move from left B to right B during the B.
3) Play left B, then move from right C# to left C# during the C#.
4) Slide from left B to left C#.
All these options end on left C# which you need for the D# (assuming no left Ab/Eb key).

For the second part (D# B C# D#) where you get "stuck" with same side fingerings (again depending on tempo etc.):
1) Slide from D# to right B.
2) Move from left B to right B during the B.
3) Move from right C# to left C# during the C#.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the replys! Seems like I'll have to slide from D# to B with my right pinky.....it's on a fast django tune. I didn't know if there was some alternate that I was unaware of. I'm a sax player but play lots of clarinet lately and just ran into this sequence on this tune that I really like. Thanks for all the info! Zack
 

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For the second part (D# B C# D#) where you get "stuck" with same side fingerings (again depending on tempo etc.):
1) Slide from D# to right B.
2) Move from left B to right B during the B.
3) Move from right C# to left C# during the C#.
I would go with one of these. It will be cleaner than than the slide. Slides can be wonderful. But not that one..
 
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