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Discussion Starter #1
I searched all over the web and can't find a fingering chart that includes the high F# & G keys.

Can someone point me in the right direction?

Thanks
 

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I don't really understand your question..

Isn't high F sharp just the three palm keys, side F, and the F sharp key?

Or front F and C, plus the F sharp key.
 

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dstreet - I'm assuming that you're referring to the newer soprano's that include not only a high F# key, but also a high G key ? Guess they don't include the little booklets anymore that show the fingerings, or am I showing my age ? I just had a quick 'google' and you'd be very lucky to find any fingering chart (not just for soprano) that includes high F# and G - except as 'low altissimo' fingerings, which don't use those two keys that most of us don't have...

As sod9728 says, isn't it just a case of playing a normal 'all open' F and adding the F# key for F# ? Then adding the G key for G ?

At the thought of all those open keys (If I had them) it seems much more economical on the fingers playing them as 'alternate/altissimo' anyway. What will you do when you play another sax that doesn't have those keys ?

If you want a guide to the altissimo fingerings, here's a good start, choice of loads...
http://www.wfg.woodwind.org/sax/
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes, you guessed right - newer model with high F# & G keys.

Well, the problem is I don't play the sax - :D yet - (but mine is on the way!) - so I don't know which keys are the high F# and G.

I've found a couple of decent enough fingering charts, but they all top out at F.

I guess I'll have to figure out which are the two "extra" keys and figure out what they do :(
 

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dstreet said:
I guess I'll have to figure out which are the two "extra" keys and figure out what they do :(
all you have to do is see which to keys operate the two highest pads (well the two little ones are for the octave keys, but the two highest besides those). they will be keys you operate w/ your right hand.
 

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dstreet - if you don't play sax (yet) then you won't be concerned about high F# and G for a while......;)

Unless of course you're already a clarinet player ?
 

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cmelodysax said:
Unless of course you're already a clarinet player ?

:D High G's to start songs... Definitely comes near that whole period of there being a similarity between squeaks and notes...

That being said, the high F# and G keys will be located near the side Bb, C, and chromatic F# keys. Might be one key cut in two pieces, both literally right next to each other. The G key will open the hole nearest the mouthpiece (besides the octave vent), and the F# the second highest. I assume that is what you were asking? The location of the keys?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks - I think I can figure it out from your posts - I'm coming from trumpet (hey, at least it is in the same key!) - I always wanted a high F# and G key :)
 

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When in doubt, look at which hole opens. The closer to the mouthpiece the hole is (not the lever) the higher the note.
 

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dstreet said:
I searched all over the web and can't find a fingering chart that includes the high F# & G keys.

Can someone point me in the right direction?

Thanks
Ask your teacher at your first lesson.:)
 

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You certainly need a basic fingering chart. I found one that came with one of two books I bought when I was getting back into sax after a 20 year laps. One book was The Art of Saxophone Playing by Larry Teal. That is a good text book for anyone regardless of which horn they will be playing. The chart is by Yamaha. It does not show the F#3 and G3 keys (which are the keys you want.

They are not in the palm keys nor are they special combinations of other keys. Look for the three main keys on which your three right hand fingers rest. Just in back of the key your middle finger rests on (which plays F# when used alone) is another F# key with pearl on it. This is used to trill with the F key under your index finger. Just above this F# trill key are the two keys you want - the F#3 key and the G3 key. They do not look like normal keys but are flat plates that open holes near the top of the horn. They can be played by sliding up your middle finger to get one or the other or adding the ring finger to play both. I have been running back and forth to my den where I put a dry reed on the horn but it is late and I am not about to awaken the neighborhood by screaming out a G. It is something I do during the day (when neighbors are at work) without thinking but to describe the technique to you now is impossible.

Those are the keys but Don't be in a big hurry to use them. Have you played other saxes? If the sop is your first instrument, you are in for a long tough job of learning EVERYTHING!!!!!! It is best to learn sax first using a tenor or an alto. There are also a lot of work opportunities for people on these horns either in school or outside of school.

Soprano sax is a special instrument in many ways. It is a solo instrument. You won't find section of sopranos in any band. This is mainly because no two players can blend together very well. One would hope that very experienced people could do that but few want to try. To play soprano you must know a lot about music in general to be able to handle all the issues of solo work. The tone depends very much on each individual player - his or her build, chest, throat and mouth volume and on individual approaches. Starting a note can be simple, like touching the key of an organ but seldom is on the sop because each nore is part of a song so the player uses a method to play one note based on the style of the somng and the surrounding notes.

In any case it would be wise to find an accomplished soprano sax player as a teacher. I would not recommend a generic "band teacher."

I checked and confirmed that, to play F#3 and G3, you must be holding all the palm keys (D, D#, E and F) and then add one of these keys. But you must find a mouthpiece that plays these in tune. My Selmers (SS and S-80) don't do as well as my Runyon Custom.
 
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