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Discussion Starter #1
Due to a medical condition, my saxophone playing days are over. Acquired in 1978, it has remained untouched for the last 13 years.:(

It is a Selmer Paris Mark VI alto, 69xxx (body and neck numbers correspond), original laquer, no dents/dings. I know it's got to be worked on before I market it but I'm wondering just how much I should spend to bring it up to par. One of the best in town quoted me $1400 but there are other reputable repair shops in the area much cheaper. Also, when percentage of laquer is discussed, how does one calculate that?

I appreciate any feedback you all might have.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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$1,400 is WAY WAY to much for an overhaul. Unless it needs major work $500 to $600 would be fair (of course this depends on the area) Lacquer is always an extimate but if your horn is original lacquer - leaver it that way. I think is a 5 yo 6 thousand dollar horn (check E-bay completed sales) Good Luck
 

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don't have it worked, leave that to the new owner. Most MKVI prospective buyers would only comment on how the overhaul is wrong and they need to have it corrected (in order to bargain the price) IMHO.
 

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Sorry about your medical condition. I agree on leaving out the overhaul, that way it can get the exact pads & resonators as well as regulation that the buyer wants. You're actually saving him/her money. I'm under the impression that lacquer percentages are estimates to get a ball park idea of the horns vibe. Pictures can be even more helpful.
 

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don't have it worked, leave that to the new owner. Most MKVI prospective buyers would only comment on how the overhaul is wrong and they need to have it corrected (in order to bargain the price) IMHO.
I agree on this one. Its too much unless the horn is trashed. You may as well figure market value of the horn and mark down the price the value of a quality overhaul. Not a godlike overhaul...a good one.

Most players looking for a VI will either gripe or they are more than prepared to get a fair buy and have the horn setup to their individual tastes and preferences.

I bought mine with a fresh overhaul and I wish I had gotten a better deal the opportunity to choose my own tech.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
All of your comments have been very helpful. I know there is a huge range of "market value", especially for a good horn. I thought it would have to be in top shape for people to try out.
 

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I thought it would have to be in top shape for people to try out.
That depends upon how you sell it. Ebay might bring you top dollar for such a horn, but you'd have to be very familiar with using it and recognizing scams. You have to keep in mind however, that an alto VI ain't gonna bring in the kind of money that a tenor would.
 

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Where are you in Texas? If you're in Dallas, I can recommend a tech to evaluate it. My instinct would be to sell it as is, but if it won't cost much to make it playable you could go that route.
 

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I thought it would have to be in top shape for people to try out.
Playable condition is a long way from "top shape" - about $500 to $1000 away.

If selling on the internet, even playing condition isn't going to matter much to someone that would be buying that kind of horn. Of course, you could take it to a tech and ask for it to be put in "playing condition" - get the leaks out and lube it but don't replace every pad and rebuild the mechanism.

Put some pictures up here and see what offers you get - and don't take the first low ball thrown.
 

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