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Discussion Starter #1
just been given a horn that has no makers name or marks. It has key guards the resemble those of an old martin or that ilk. However, it was bought in a car boot by a mate who cant be bothered with it. It has 2 octave keys side by side. Never seen this before. It doesnt seem to be that old. does anyone know of a fingering chart that will work with this beast. Im quite new to the sax myself so this is a liitle wierd.

Any ideas
 

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Early saxes had two octave keys and stayedthat way until the Sax patents ran out in about 1882. After that all manufacturers moved to single octave keys, although I believe Conn made saxes with two as late as 1911. If your sax has split bell keys, it is likely to be American; same side bell keys, more likely French (or other European).... unless it really is something weird. If it is a little on the short side, then it is may well be old with a larger bore.

I assume it is not a bari with an additional key for low A.

That's the best I can do.... now for some more expert opinions ....
 

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No name...no markings...two octave keys means its probably a contemporary Indian sax.....they are based on a old design. If that is the case I wouldn`t worry about how to play with two octave keys....rather, how to play it at all!!!!
 

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BuffetBlowerDude said:
No name...no markings...two octave keys means its probably a contemporary Indian sax.....they are based on a old design. If that is the case I wouldn`t worry about how to play with two octave keys....rather, how to play it at all!!!!
Aren't those the ones that are only keyed down to about low C, or some such nonsense? (As much as I love the thought of a world without LH pinky keys...)

A saxophone keyed from low D up to high C - now that would be very nice. So much less to worry about.
 

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The lever that opens the key on the body is used for D2 up through G#2 and the lever for the neck octave vent is for A2 on up. Newer horns switch over by themselves thus only one lever. Thsi went out of style in the early 1900s.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks

To those that actually answered my question......thanks.

To the others..why answer at all?
 

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Taff60 said:
To those that actually answered my question......thanks.

To the others..why answer at all?
From what I can tell, your two questions (though neither of them actually qualified as questions, since neither of them ended in "?") were:

1. does anyone know of a fingering chart that will work with this beast
2. Any ideas

The first, second, and third replies to your post all apply to your second question, "Any ideas". You see, the reason for these posts was the idea that one or more of these replies might help you to learn more about the possible origin of your unmarked saxophone (which was an unasked, but implied, question in your original post).

The fourth reply to your post applies to your first question, "does anyone know of a fingering chart that will work with this beast".

Next time please try to exercise a little more discretion before you get all pissy with people who are only trying to offer a little friendly, helpful advice.

Good luck with your new saxophone.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Stacey, sorry for any offence caused and for the lesson in punctuation. Its good that our cousins from across the Atlantic have mastered such trivialities.
(Joke). Even if they haven't realised that 'pissey' is a swear word yet!

The "ideas" I was after, were ones on how to play this horn not on its origin or value. These are unimportant as this was given to me by a dear friend who got it as part of house clearance.

Ive done a bit more research and it it an identical copy of a pre 1900 Antoine-Joseph Sax Alto (saxpics is a great site). If only it were real!!!!!!!!! ( I am under no illusions in that department).

So to clarify a point: Does anybody know on a fingering chart (and key schematic) for this hornY

Id just like to make some decent noises from it someday. I've only just got used to all the buttons on my existing horn.
 

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I don't have a link to an online fingering chart. However, just about any "normal" fingering chart should work just fine. The points you will need to keep in mind include:

As mentioned by someone earlier, your horn has two octave keys which cover different parts of the instrument's range. On modern fingering charts you will just see one octave button depicted. You will need to interpret this as "press whichever button opens the octave hole on the NECK when playing notes A2 and above, press the OTHER octave button instead for notes D2-G#2." For notes below D2, don't press either one.

Your horn may not be keyed as high as modern saxes. If your fingering chart includes fingerings for F#3 and possibly even G3, you can ignore them, because you won't have those keys. Depending on your horn, you might not even have a palm key for F3, in which case you could ignore that one, too. And you might not even have the side key for high E, so there goes another.

Perhaps because God wants to compensate you for these missing keys, He may have given you a couple of extras NOT found on most modern horns - you may have a G# trill key located just below where you would normally put the first finger of your right hand. You may also have a "forked Eb" mechanism. Both of these mechanisms are features I really like, and wish were on modern horns. Hell of a lot more useful than a high G key, IMHO.

If you are new to the saxophone itself, don't let all of the above "exceptions" scare you. Just google "saxophone fingering chart" or similar, start with fingerings right in the middle of the range, and you should find that most of them work just fine.

Again, good luck.

I do miss boot sales. And real beer. And roundabouts.
 

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Think of it like a car without the automatic gearbox. You just need to shift keys when you get up to A2! Oboe players have been doing this for years but we all know they are crazy. As I recall, getting pissy in the UK means drunk, so sometimes it is not all that bad.
 

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I think You`ll find on this side of the pond it`s getting "pissed" for drunk....pissey is "pissed off"....ahhh!....the English language, isn`t it marvelous?

And by the way Taff60....it IS important where the sax came from....(whether you asked or not) because if it is Indian they are made so badly You won`t get any notes from it at all....whatever fingering You use!
Even the great Kenny G couldn`t play one......ooer! did I just say that?:shock:
 

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Very early horns have 2 octave keys and the Indian cheap and nasty copys have, you press the 1st key for 2nd D and the second key for 2nd A and above
Dave
 

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Does it have red squishy pads? Are the rollers (red) spiral fluted plastic? Are the posts attached to poorly shaped ribs? Are some of the rods split pins?

These are all indicators of the notorious POS Indian thing that looks a bit like a sax but is a disgrace to the name.

It may be that you have a little gem on your hands ... but most likely not!!
 

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stitch said:
Does it have red squishy pads? Are the rollers (red) spiral fluted plastic? Are the posts attached to poorly shaped ribs? Are some of the rods split pins?

These are all indicators of the notorious POS Indian thing that looks a bit like a sax but is a disgrace to the name.
Oh .... didn't need to tell you that, did I, looks like you scored one on eBay last month ..... :oops:
 

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Stitch, are you talking to yourself again? You're getting as bad as me...

No, it looks like our friend has THREE such saxes to sort out - the one scored on eBay, the one obtained by a dear friend as part of a house clearance, and the one bought by a mate at a car boot sale. The poor guy has Gear Acquisition Syndrome as severe as any of us.

Anyway, with a little luck and with the fingering chart comments offered throughout this thread, he will surely have great success in his endeavors.
 

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Stacey said:
Stitch, are you talking to yourself again?
:D


Stacey said:
No, it looks like our friend has THREE such saxes to sort out - the one scored on eBay, the one obtained by a dear friend as part of a house clearance, and the one bought by a mate at a car boot sale.
To buy one Indian "saxophone" is unfortunate, to buy three ......
 
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