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I've been practicing fairly regularly about 2 months now on my Conn 16M and wanted to try a few new mouthpieces. So I purchaes a C5 and B5 rico Graftonite from Amazon. The mouthpiece that I had been using had no identifiers on it though someone who knew better than I said that it looked 'quite good quality'. Now with that mouthpiece I could quite comfortably cover the normal range of the instrument. F# was the only altissimo note I could manage and I was hoping one of these new mouthpieces would help. The C5 was a struggle so I put it aside. The B5 took me by surprise as well requiring a lot more air and created a lot more volume and very bright. I was unable to play softly and I found myself backing off taking in less mouthpiece. But it WAS a lot easier hitting the F# so presumably it will help altissimo.
After around 15 minutes I reverted back to my old mouthpiece and was amazed how that one now seemed to be very resistive to airflow - it took another 5 minutes to become used to it again.
BTW reeds are all 2.5 vandorens.
Is this all fairly 'typical' and will a little bit of persistence with the new mouthpieces pay off? Should I be using softer reeds?
BTW I used to play many years ago so not really a beginner but very out of practice.
BTW2 I'm also expecting a Rico Metallite M5 in the mail any day now.
 

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After around 15 minutes I reverted back to my old mouthpiece and was amazed how that one now seemed to be very resistive to airflow - it took another 5 minutes to become used to it again.
This is normal after trying a much larger or more free-blowing mouthpiece. Sometimes it's good and sometimes it's bad. If you're other piece felt like it was holding you back, then a piece that can take more air may help. This recently happened to me. I had been playing a piece for about 4 years and it started to feel restrictive in the higher register. I found a piece that can take more air but still allow me to get a good tone quality in the low register.

The key for me is to make sure you can still do everything on that piece. You mentioned that it made it hard to play quietly. This could mean that you're not ready for a larger piece. Or maybe try a softer reed.
 

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On a whim, I threw on my Graftonite after practicing with my rascher... Big difference for me. Oddly, while I couldn't control the low end back when I started on the graftonite, after 3 weeks with the rascher, I was able to voice the low end the way I wanted it and stay in tune.

I'm a beginner, but it is normal human instinct to respond not to actual conditions, but the percieved change in them. It is "hotter" outside of my air conditioned office than it is outside of my open windowed home, just because I acclimated to something cooler.

Since the practice where I suddenly could work the graftonite, I'm including 10 mins of graftonite play just to stay "adjusted" to it. It is not my preferred sound, but if I ever needed to compete with an amplified guitar (or a nearby explosion), I would probably play it. Besides, the "extra air requirement" will hopefully help me to work on my lung capacity.
 
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