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Yeah! Tap 1 & 3! I started doing that a year ago and it literally changed the way I hear music. Got it from a Barry Harris Masterclass video.

That one click per bar thing sounds hip! Gotta try that

And the final step, emulate the time feels you love. Cant beat it.

Great stuff
 

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Great! Just what I need.

My teacher says that I would be a good improviser if only I could internalize the beat and play with better time feeling. I kind of push and play on top of the beat, and I often "fall over" and actually play ahead of it. I think that I have too much sense of responsibility for the rhythm going forward when I improvise in a band, which makes be try to take the lead even rhythmically - and even with a recorded rhythm section (which I can't affect anyway). I may be aware of both the symptoms and the cause to my problem. But since the time feel is quite deep ingrained in your playing, I realize that I will have to give an hour a day for a long period to practice time feel.

I would be very grateful for any further tips on how to do this effectively, since it will be a significant part of my practice day for a long time. Thanks. :treble:
 

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expcat, another great dose of medicine is recording yourself and listening back. Thats always a great wake up call!

I'd record myself with a rhythm section and without so you can learn to hear your rushing tendencies no matter what the context. The better you can hear whats actually happening the better chance you have of correcting it.
 

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Yes, I have read about that recording oneself is good for studying what's happening with one's playing. I have'nt start doing this - yet. Now that you point it out, I can see that it could be the key for me to correct my rushing tendencies. Thanks for all your tips, BenBrittonJazz!
 

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Great! Just what I need.

My teacher says that I would be a good improviser if only I could internalize the beat and play with better time feeling. I kind of push and play on top of the beat, and I often "fall over" and actually play ahead of it. I think that I have too much sense of responsibility for the rhythm going forward when I improvise in a band, which makes be try to take the lead even rhythmically - and even with a recorded rhythm section (which I can't affect anyway). I may be aware of both the symptoms and the cause to my problem. But since the time feel is quite deep ingrained in your playing, I realize that I will have to give an hour a day for a long period to practice time feel.

I would be very grateful for any further tips on how to do this effectively, since it will be a significant part of my practice day for a long time. Thanks. :treble:
Practising exercises with a metronome is aleways good value.
Try to get right in the pocket.
Practise slowly at first.
A lot of people rush when they think they have a difficult passage
to play. You have to relax and settle into it.
The secret is to know it so well you don't have to rush.
 

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There was this cat From Los Angeles who they say played behind the beat yet he always seemed on time.. The son of a doctor . He kinda wrote the book for modern tenor sound after Pres. ,and man could he swing. That style is called a lazy tenor.
 
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