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I do know something about the only previous owner of a 1955 Buffet Dynaction I picked up at an auction. It had the receipt from the original purchase, and with a little internet sleuthing I was able to learn that a sheriff in Illinois had purchased it for his niece. She kept it all her life and I was fortunate enough to spot it at the estate sale. Needs some work, and the finish is not as pristine as might be expected from a closet horn so she must’ve played it a good bit at some point. Looking forward to the day I can devote the time and money to getting into the shape it deserves and enjoying it myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
@Brujo It's so cool that you tracked down the story behind that receipt. Good sleuthing!
 
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
My 1971 MK VI was a one-owner that was sold to Sax Alley. I stupidly bought it as 'near mint' but this was 1998 and the net was just starting, so since Sax Alley had a good rep, I bought it. When it arrived, it did look good but it had evidence of at least one 'event' that had been repaired, which also involved the neck. It did play/sound great, though, so when SA offered a few hundred back, I took it. I would just like to ask that guy what happened to it. Its been through several overhauls now and i had the neck tweaked by Kim Bock, and the horn is at a performance peak. Judging by the condition of the horn, which had 50% original pads when i got it, I concluded that the owner had been a doubler, perhaps a pit reed man. It still ain't too shaggy, but no, I don't ever think about him or what he played - couldn't care less, really. But since it was made the year King Curtis was killed, sometimes i think about it as my KC tribute horn.

View attachment 109425
I enjoy people's photos of their saxes!
 

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I still have a Selmer Largebore alto, Cir. 1929. No way of knowing who owned it previously, it didn't even come with a case. Anyway, I'd rather think about what kind of music was played on it over the years. I'm thinking trad jazz or big band swing ...
 

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My two Keilwerth stencil sops seem each to have been played a lot by a distinctive personality. The Dutch one must have been played by someone who chain-smoked to the point the very metal is infused with nicotine and breathing in even near the thing gave me a sore throat. I believe that he didn't actually die, just the nicotine-mummification process reached a point where they had to pry his fingers off the sop and bury him just because it had been a month and he still hadn't finished his last sentence.

The Couf must have been played endlessly by a player who was a control freak, the action is set very low, and he must have kept the sax in his lap when eating because there are strange drool-like patterns of lacquer loss and corrosion on it.
Jeezus Kreist, man, what a totally scary deal!
 

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1957 Conn 6M, 1924 Conn C Melody gold plated time capsule, Antigua Powerbell Tenor
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I would love to know who owned my 1927 Martin goldplate alto. It looks gorgeous, but stuff a leaklight down it and just about every tonehole has leaks that look like moon slivers. Someone went through the trouble to replace all of the springs but none of the pads which are toasty. It almost looks like it was barely played. It must have been pretty pricey when it was new. I shake my head every time I open the case and look at it. My Conn goldplate I purchased from the original owners grand daughter. I received written history and a photo of him. He was a professional player and wrote music so that was pretty neat.
 

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I did buy a Martin baritone (1956 CIII) that was sold by a family to the sax dealer 'Jaye' (cant remember the last name) in CA. It had been bought for a young girl to play in the school band. She did really well and apparently went to college on her music skills, but over the years eventually gave it up with family/career priorities. In that particular case it was interesting to know. Eventually I grew tired of the Martin's ergonomics and besides, i wanted a low A. The horn went to World Wide Sax.

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Tenor, alto, Bb Clarinet, Flute
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I have no idea who owned my Conn tenor. I bought it on eBay about 12 or 13 years ago. The one I'd love to know more about is the antique clarinet I picked up on shopgoodwill. It's keyed to C and the joints and bell have ivory bands instead of metal. The body is tan colored boxwood. My tech tells me it was probably made around 1830. Can you imagine how many owners it may have had? I suspect they were classical players in a symphony. The first joint near the barrel had a crack repaired with four tiny screws and I believe the screws hold a new tenon in place. The barrel was messed up so bad in an attempt to make it fit the damaged 1st joint that a new one had to be made. And two keys were missing and had to be fabricated from scratch. It's French so I suspect it was probably brought to the US from Europe. How it ever survived all those European wars, the Civil War and two world wars will forever remain a mystery.

Don't ask what it's worth vs. what I have in it. I had it restored just because I'm probably the only guy on Earth with a 1830s Herouard Pere et Fils13 key C clarinet. I think that's pretty cool.

Someone asked for pics so here you go:
Note the lack of a thumb hook and rings. Plus there's an extra key on the lower joint that has to be opened to make low F play in tune. It plays more like a recorder than a clarinet as far as fingering. Not easy to play.

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This last one is an image of the way it looked before it was cleaned and restored. Note the missing G# key and the missing thread on the tenon. The new thread is bright red which is pretty cool. You can also get a pretty good idea of how small small the horn is compared to a Bb clarinet by seeing it in comparison to my hand.

109443
 

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I did buy a Martin baritone (1956 CIII) that was sold by a family to the sax dealer 'Jaye' (cant remember the last name) in CA. It had been bought for a young girl to play in the school band. She did really well and apparently went to college on her music skills, but over the years eventually gave it up with family/career priorities. In that particular case it was interesting to know. Eventually I grew tired of the Martin's ergonomics and besides, i wanted a low A. The horn went to World Wide Sax.

View attachment 109432
I love the Crown Royal bag in the case. I always saved them for sax necks and such.
 

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I’ve got a mid ‘30s 6M I bought from a woman in MO who told me her parents bought it for her and her brother to use for school in the late ‘50s; it was a used horn & the store they bought it from told them the previous owner had been a K.C. based big-band musician who had bought it new from the same store & traded it for a new horn. I’ve got a Buescher TT alto I bought from a guy in Vicksburg Miss who told me it had been his uncle’s, who was from around New Orleans and had played it a lot down there until he moved up the river; I’ve got a another Buescher, ‘30s Aristocrat, that came with a bunch of gig-gear up to and including a clip-on bow tie, and business cards for IIRC the “Peppermint Orchestra” out of Dallas, TX.
 

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Alto: Buescher Aristocrat 1937, Tenor: Yanagisawa T880, Bari: Martin Committee III 1948
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yup - my 37 buescher alto came from a reasonably famous australian rock and roll guy from the 70s and 80s. it was his first good horn and him and my father did a trade in 1984 for it. my "new" 48 martin bari was owned by a pennsylvania jazz / orchestra guy called Don. I always ask. The Yani tenor came from my uncle - god knows where he got it
 
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