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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Great idea. I've seen too many soprano players using a conventional strap, ending up pointing the horn down or pointing their head down.
 

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My college teacher, Jim Rotter over in LA, had a similar device that was made for him when he played with Harvey Pittel. He said that Pittel would use something akin to that device, so he made a copy.

This is a production version of the same concept.
 

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a product looking for a problem to solve
That a problem exists for many players is not in doubt. Just read the numerous threads here about thumb/hand/wrist/forearm pain from soprano playing.

Whether this accessory is the best solution to the problem obviously will depend on the individual. Personally, I think it would be awkward, but then I successfully addressed the soprano challenge by using a curved sop with a strap.
 

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Primarily Tenor with occasional Alto
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My college teacher, Jim Rotter over in LA, had a similar device that was made for him when he played with Harvey Pittel. He said that Pittel would use something akin to that device, so he made a copy.

This is a production version of the same concept.
Here is what Harvey Pittel is using now. http://www.pittelhandeze.com/
 

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I respectfully disagree. This would help me, for sure, as holding the weight of the sop has been a problem. That, or just throw the damn thing away already . . . .
 

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Discussion Starter #13
That a problem exists for many players is not in doubt. Just read the numerous threads here about thumb/hand/wrist/forearm pain from soprano playing.
+1

I get elbow/forearm/wrist pain in my right arm. Two things I've tried when I'm practising are:
1. Rest the bell on a surface that's at the correct height.
2. Rest my right forearm on the arm of a chair.

Both of these techniques seem to help for a while - but there's a problem. My arm is "locked" into one position and begins to ache.
The Ergosax would support the soprano, and it might allow me to move my arms from side to side which would slightly change the wrist and elbow angles.
 

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there is no doubt that a MINORITY of people would benefit from this ... thing.

I for one went to play curved soprano (and I loved it!) because of shoulders problems which at some point prevented me to even put on a jacket without being helped! Let alone supporting the straight soprano saxophone, even if with the elbows would have been kept tight on the chest.

However there is no doubt that performing, in public, with this thing would invite people to ask you about your evident health problems if you were to sport one of these on stage.

When I first started using the SAXHOLDER I got a lot of strange looks and questions.

Also, using this for clarinet is certainly possible since the new trend in embouchure and playing position with many clarinet players is to play in a way that resembles closely soprano playing as opposed to the older clarinet playing.

Anyway, if Arno Bornkamp can perform like this (due to several problems with neck and shoulders ) anyone can use anything and , by the way, Arno Bornkamp could be a great testimonial.



 

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there is no doubt that a MINORITY of people would benefit from this ... thing.

I for one went to play curved soprano (and I loved it!) because of shoulders problems which at some point prevented me to even put on a jacket without being helped! Let alone supporting the straight soprano saxophone, even if with the elbows would have been kept tight on the chest.

However there is no doubt that performing, in public, with this thing would invite people to ask you about your evident health problems if you were to sport one of these on stage.

When I first started using the SAXHOLDER I got a lot of strange looks and questions.

Also, using this for clarinet is certainly possible since the new trend in embouchure and playing position with many clarinet players is to play in a way that resembles closely soprano playing as opposed to the older clarinet playing.

Anyway, if Arno Bornkamp can perform like this (due to several problems with neck and shoulders ) anyone can use anything and , by the way, Arno Bornkamp could be a great testimonial.



...is that connected to his head? That seems as bad for your neck as a regular neckstrap...(I cannot stop laughing)...but I guess I won't knock it 'til I've tried it
 

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I ‘ve started a thread some time ago about why he uses a headband and apparently he perspires profusely.

However, more to the point of this thread, the neck superpadding is supposed to relieve the stress on the neck.

OP’s gizmo will take any stress away in that region.

As far as I can see, the support is hinging on the belt at his lowest point. THERE is where all the weight will be.

Funny though this contraption looks it will relieve stress but to the detriment of looks and practicality.

My guess is that, unless they start claiming some sonic vibrationalist improvements ( Arno Bornkamp also uses a LeFreque b.t.w.), their market will be limited to few people whom, like me, have ( I no longer seem to have that big a problem as I used to) a serious problem with their shoulders.

My response to these problems was using a curved soprano and a saxholder.
 
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It's not something I would be interested in as I find how I use the standard strap works for me. I wear the strap on the loose side, so it is not taking any weight of the Sop when playing. But in the breaks ( even the smallest breaks) of the music, I let the strap bear the full weight which is enough time for my arms/wrists to re cover. Using the lots of mini breaks works for me. If you play mostly Tenor.... Play pushing the Tenor away from the body, using your arms to support the weight.
 

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Indeed that’s how I play and have always played any saxophone (with the exception of a Buescher C melody because it was impossible).

But that is not the case if your shoulders really ache. Luckily you may not have had this problem as I did , but again, I got to the point that I needed to ask help to put on a jacket.


There are a number of conditions which might require a solution like this and maybe someone, even without any condition to deal with, might even find it simply agreeable.

On a side note (what a pun!) if you play with a tenor (or other saxophone) held in front and not on the side. You will never have (this is not a problem with sopranos though) any condensation dripping on your fingers.
 

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Does your Saxholder work well for your soprano saxophone?
Thanks,
Heath

there is no doubt that a MINORITY of people would benefit from this ... thing.

I for one went to play curved soprano (and I loved it!) because of shoulders problems which at some point prevented me to even put on a jacket without being helped! Let alone supporting the straight soprano saxophone, even if with the elbows would have been kept tight on the chest.

However there is no doubt that performing, in public, with this thing would invite people to ask you about your evident health problems if you were to sport one of these on stage.

When I first started using the SAXHOLDER I got a lot of strange looks and questions.

Also, using this for clarinet is certainly possible since the new trend in embouchure and playing position with many clarinet players is to play in a way that resembles closely soprano playing as opposed to the older clarinet playing.

Anyway, if Arno Bornkamp can perform like this (due to several problems with neck and shoulders ) anyone can use anything and , by the way, Arno Bornkamp could be a great testimonial.



 

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My saxholder worked very well with the curved soprano when I had one, the only “ problem” was that I had to add an extra short hook to the normal one so that I could use it in the shortest position with this (and other saxophones in the longer positions).

I no longer play soprano but I still use the saxholder on tenor. If you ask my neck, regardless of the weight, this has to be one of the best inventions ever.

Sometimes, purely for aesthetic reasons, I use a strap and in that case I use a Just Joe, which, as far as straps go, is one of the best.
 
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