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Forum Contributor 2007-2012, Distinguished SOTW Te
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

Are there any environmentally friendly or at least less toxic and miserable ways of stripping lacquer that you guys have found?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
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Hi matt, I have a product called enviro strip, two part mixture that doesnt smell much either, but needs to be heated to be activated, strips a sax in 5 minutes of all lacquer when heated to 50 degrees celcius,can be disposed of as well with no issue. Im still on the same batch I made 2 years ago, so it goes a long way as well.

I will ask my distributor next week if they have an american version (im sure they do), be warned its not cheap.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
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there must be.

I know someone in a shop here in Holland http://www.aerofoon-atelier.nl/ who feel very strongly about the environment (they live and work in a farm in the middle of the beautiful countryside) and they told me that they had developed a simple lacquer stripping chemical which is entirely environmentally biodegradable and has no harmful chemicals, they also told me that it is based on household chemicals but were secretive about its composition because they thought that other technicians might steal the secret.

Perhaps if you write Frank & Ruth (and because you are not based in the Netherlands) they might want to share their secret with you!

Old lacquers can be stripped with salt and hot water but I don't think that modern lacquers are that easy to be stripped. Nevertheless they say that there is an easy solution (pun intended!)
 

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Maybe i'll sound silly.I delacquered some parts of my 180xxx MKVI with one like this: http://www.papenor-alfil.com/fotos/catalogo-general-10-k60011.jpg
I rubbed the green part against the horn surface and the lacquer came out as very fine dust very easily and with no scratches, a really nice finish.The first days it looked really shiny but after some weeks it darkened.I think it might be more difficult for the small parts.Have a look at how the inside of the bell looks now in the picture i attached here.
Probably all this is a lot of bulls**t for you experienced technicians but i talk from my ignorant experimental experience.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
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could be........I have removed old lacquer with boiling hot water and salt........
 

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Forum Contributor 2007-2012, Distinguished SOTW Te
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Discussion Starter #7
Huh! and salt, you say! I've heard boiling water before but not salt.

How did the boiling water work? Poured over, boiled in a tub? Cellulose lacquer?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
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Actually I got the idea from the instruction of a Portuguese copper cooking pot a " Cataplana" which is lacquered for protection of the copper and needs to be unlacquerd before use. You need to boil the water and salt and immerse the item which needs unlacquering in the salty boiling water and leave it there , after a while you will see the lacquer getting bubbles underneath its surface and you should be able to peel it off. This works for sure with old lacquers I don't know if it also work with new ones. I will be happy to hear how it goes.
 

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Forum Contributor 2007-2012, Distinguished SOTW Te
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Discussion Starter #9
I dunno, I'd be scared to boil it in salt. Boil it maybe, but not in what I think of as a corrosion catalyst.

If I try boiling I'll do it on a parts horn and report back- probably won't be for a year or so, though. I'm going to wait until I've got a bigger place and some land out back to give it a go. If anyone who has tried it sees this before then, do tell.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
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I fill my bathtub with very hot water (not boiling mind you, but about 90deg C water) and one long immersion (more than 30minutes) in hor water gets like 80% of the cellulose lac stripped. Then I clean it by hand (soft bristles brush and an industrial grade grease removing detergent) and immerse the thing back in hot water maybe one or 2 more times. No cellulose lacquer has lasted more than 3 immersions. If I use soda mixed in the full bathtub (like 1 kilo per filled enough to cover a tenor bell bathtub) it last anywhere between 1 or 2 "cycles"
 

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I meant to say that you immerse it in water that has been boiling (not keep on boiling during the immersion!) so the water is off the boil and of course by the time you immerse a metal item some of the heat would have dissipated. Anyway salt didn't corrode copper or the bras of a neck that I did this way I guess because I rinsed it in non salted water when I started handling the metal object........
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
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I meant to say that you immerse it in water that has been boiling (not keep on boiling during the immersion!) so the water is off the boil and of course by the time you immerse a metal item some of the heat would have dissipated. Anyway salt didn't corrode copper or the bras of a neck that I did this way I guess because I rinsed it in non salted water when I started handling the metal object........
I, as a customer, would have big concerns about wether I heve been let known of the less hot less salty water rinse or not.
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:mrgreen:
 

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Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
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you would be right to do so...............but I didn't charge anything for any of this and gave full disclosure to the person who asked me to do that so........Don't look a gift horse in the mouth!:mrgreen:
 

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you would be right to do so...............but I didn't charge anything for any of this and gave full disclosure to the person who asked me to do that so........Don't look a gift horse in the mouth!:mrgreen:
I don't charge for delacquering or relacquering on my full overhauls so everithing you say applies to my advice :twisted:

BTW the don't charging extra for either delacquer, relacquer or "don't alter anything" OH is 100% true.
 

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My tech here charges me for that and quite a bit too (he is cheaper than others mind you!) .........shame that sending things to Argentina would be a deal killer otherwise I would consider that! I might be a little opinionated though.......
 

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Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
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well, the title was attributed on account of a previous work experience as export manager of a coffee company .......but I still know a thing or two about the devil's brew
 

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Forum Contributor 2007-2012, Distinguished SOTW Te
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Discussion Starter #19
Juan that is incredible that you don't charge extra for delacquer/relacquer/nothing. I'm obviously doing things wrong, because delacquering and hand polishing takes me more time than I want to disclose. Care to share tips?

Sounds like very hot water is the way to go. What do you use to heat it? Fire in the back yard? Giant pots of boiling water on a stove? Surplus locomotive boiler? This time next year I'll have lots more space, so a tub over a fire would actually be doable.
 

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Milandro, as long as you're a real cofee guru I'd work with you any time of the week :twisted:
well, the title was attributed on account of a previous work experience as export manager of a coffee company .......but I still know a thing or two about the devil's brew
Netherlands, Coffee Gurus... what kind of devil's brew are we talking about here?...:drunken:
 
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