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Anyone tried learning engraving by doing some work on your old student model horns? What have you learned? Let me see what you've done. Show off your work, even if it's bad.
 

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Not to disappoint the OP, but....over the years here I have seen no threads on 'hey check out my engraving'. I don't think many folks endeavor/embark on this sorta thing.

Cool idea, though...if I had 2 lives to live :| (lordy, I hope I don't....:cry:)
 

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There's engraving and there's engraving.
It's not really something you just try.
It's a skill that takes time to develop.
I say this with some background in hand engraving or gravure engraving.
Not your Mr Minit stuff.
 

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There's engraving and there's engraving.
It's not really something you just try.
But then again if you wanna invest in an engraver and start out on some sheets of brass from a hardware store before moving to an old beater sax or trumpet...I say go for it....

Honestly, a lot of horn engraving over time has not been all that good, so what the hey.....:)
 

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Yes but the type of engraving on a horn is done with gravers.
A rotary engraving tool is completely different and would look absolutely horrible.
Hand engraving takes plenty of time to master but as pointed out, if you can get your hands on plenty of scrap brass for practice, why not.
I'd love to get my old 12M engraved with a custom design as the naked lady is barely visible anymore.
 

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It would be far, far easier to practice hand engraving on a flat sheet of brass than on the body curves of a sax.
On a curved surface you are far more likely to slip and leave a nasty gouged line where it shouldn't be, or more likely, many of them.
 

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Wow he does lovely work.
Thanks! So to the OP -- I have some videos on how to approach the art of engraving (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSK_XRsWH-I for Part One). There are two distinct challenges that most people struggle with: artistic and mechanical. Artistic challenges are not understanding patterns and how they register with the eye. The answer to this is drawing a lot, and studying other people's designs, not dissimilar to how you learn to improvise in jazz. The mechanical part is much, much harder. Even on a good day pro engravers have "slips" where the tip of the graver goes somewhere it is not supposed to. Brass is a fickle alloy, and the process of creating a saxophone leaves different thicknesses of metal. This is amplified when dent work or other manipulation of the metal is done. I'm going to be offering engraving courses, probably next year, and I'll let you know when I do. It's fun, but also incredibly dangerous.
 

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Jason, it is your fusion of exquisite artistry, perfectionism, and incredible command and control of those most unforgiving tools that fills me with awe.
 

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Even on a good day pro engravers have "slips" where the tip of the graver goes somewhere it is not supposed to.
That's when the artist's eye takes over and finds a solution to the error. An expert can usually turn it into a "happy accident" by discovering a new creative design element they wouldn't have thought of had things proceeded without the mistake.
 

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Thanks! So to the OP -- I have some videos on how to approach the art of engraving (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSK_XRsWH-I for Part One). There are two distinct challenges that most people struggle with: artistic and mechanical. Artistic challenges are not understanding patterns and how they register with the eye. The answer to this is drawing a lot, and studying other people's designs, not dissimilar to how you learn to improvise in jazz. The mechanical part is much, much harder. Even on a good day pro engravers have "slips" where the tip of the graver goes somewhere it is not supposed to. Brass is a fickle alloy, and the process of creating a saxophone leaves different thicknesses of metal. This is amplified when dent work or other manipulation of the metal is done. I'm going to be offering engraving courses, probably next year, and I'll let you know when I do. It's fun, but also incredibly dangerous.
Hi Jason, I plan to win both the euro and uk lotteries this weekend, then I can go and hand pick some lovely instruments from all over the globe and have you engrave them for me, well in my dreams anyway, you do incredibly nice work.
 

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You guys are too kind. Thank you, sincerely, for the appreciation of my work. Re: hands, yes, fixed. I had to make some serious lifestyle changes, but I am 100% better. My base rate for any engraving job is $500, and it goes up from there depending on the requirements. I did stop doing any re-engraving only jobs, since it doesn't really fulfill me artistically. I'm hoping someone will want to do a very ornate project one of these days.
 

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Ok so I’m bringing this post back from the dead. Call me crazy, but I did exactly what the original poster was wondering. Yes indeed I did, and to make matters much worse I didn’t even practice once on anything prior to my old Yamaha student YTS23. I figure I’m an artist how hard could this be right. So designed that part is easy for me. The tools however I figured they look easy enough to make LOL boy was I wrong many slips later, many very deep stab wounds, and that’s when I decided maybe I should at least order four decent gravers. I got them from a company that I believe Jaise suggested to someone else who had asked and I went with four of what seems to be some of the more popular sizes at least in terms of doing small wriggle cuts. This made a tremendous improvement. However I wasn’t smart enough to buy the appropriate rig to be able to precisely sharpen these tools as I learn very quickly no matter how steady you think your hands are and no matter how good your hand I coordination may be, you just cannot get accurate cuts when you are trying to sharpen such accurate instruments like gravers that have very specific angles that they must keep about as precise as a surgeons scalpel

but I’m looking at a few different jigs to hold the engraver in the accurate position so I can sharpen each one without jeopardizing the specific angle of the heel and face of each Graver. I cannot stress to you how important these little things are I had no clue but my left hand has so many holes in it now due to my ignorance thinking that I could just eyeball these cuts and save the money from buying the appropriate template or Jig whatever you wanna call it to precisely sharpen each graver perfectly. I’m having a lot of fun doing this however I cannot even fathom how JaSON has done this for so long and has turned out so many beautiful instruments withoutAbsolute serious tendinitis or other issues in his arms and wrists etc. I’m almost done with my first saxophone And I can only work on it about once a week because I have something called thoracic outlet syndrome and when I start doing those quick back and forth wriggle cuts The following couple days are filled with some of the most excruciating pain that feels like electrical shocks shooting down from my armpit through the inside of my arm all the way to my finger tips. And on top of that everything is also numb too well everything except my thumb lol. Anyways I got to say I’m enjoying it however I definitely underestimated how difficult this trade actually is. So when you see JaSON‘s work and you think it’s phenomenal. It’s not, it’s absolutely brilliant. It belongs in a museum with the greatest artists to have ever lived. He is definitely my idol and I hope that he sees this. And if he does I will consider showing my work. Keep in mind this is my very first thing I’ve ever done any engraving on and like I said without the proper tools and zero practice prior. But I have a feeling heMight see some potential in me. Perhaps that’s just me dreaming but JaSON Dumars I know you’re out there. Chime in let me show you my work so you can laugh at it and you all can belittle me as much as you want LOL everyone have a great night I hope to see this thread progress
 

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I need everyone here to do the very best to get JaSON to come visit this thread. And when he does I promise you I will show you the pictures of my very first engraved torn. It’s quite unique as it’s nothing like a design you’ve ever seen on a saxophone. I did a lot of designing for tattoo artists in the past I no longer was able to tattoo because of that nerve issue I spoke of in my prior post (thoracic outlet syndrome) so I made a small side job by selling tattoo flash and designs to other tattoo artist who just needed I guess better references to to go by the please there clients. Anyways you’ll be shocked to say the least when you see the design I came up with for my first saxophone engraving.
If y’all want to see it let’s get Jason here because he’s the man I really need to talk to you most
 

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First, congratulations on embarking on this exciting journey for real. I created a thread here (Jaice's getting started with engraving thread) that might help as well. When I was first starting, I slipped a lot, and stabbed myself more times than I could count. One of the things I try and teach is to always be aware of the trajectory of the graver should it slip. You have to guard your hands. Incidentally, I also had some wrist problems when I was engraving full time. It takes time to develop a loose grip and not push too hard. You can hold the tool pretty loosely and still get good results. On thin brass, this is required or you will dent through the metal.

I'd love to see your progress, and feel free to message me and I can help you improve.
 
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