Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been playing alto for quite a while now, and I've recently picked up tenor. Im developing a decent tone with about 10-15 minutes of long tones per day on top of my other practicing, but whenever I play etudes on tenor my jaw tends to clamp down and restrict my airflow, making my sound all wimpy. Is there anything extra besides long tones I can do to fix this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Octave drops and overtones (tone matching) help. I also like using a tone idol (a player whose tone you want to emulate). Find something easy to play be this person and try to imitate the tone as closely as possible. I sometime use a double lip embouchure for a while to help.
 

·
Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2012-2015
Joined
·
5,903 Posts
I've been playing alto for quite a while now, and I've recently picked up tenor. Im developing a decent tone with about 10-15 minutes of long tones per day on top of my other practicing, but whenever I play etudes on tenor my jaw tends to clamp down and restrict my airflow, making my sound all wimpy. Is there anything extra besides long tones I can do to fix this?
You could start by writing EMBOUCHURE correctly :bluewink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Why didnt I think of that? Man, I sure wish I had realized sooner that correct spelling and tonal quality were related :D
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
You could start by writing EMBOUCHURE correctly :bluewink:
I usually tend to cringe when I see the spelling police come out on the internet because it's often just a matter of typos and it can get rather petty, but I do agree that musicians who have self-admittedly been playing "for quite a while" really should learn to spell the words that are such integral parts of the profession. What irritates me the most here on SOTW is seeing saxophone players who can't even spell the word saxophone. SAXAPHONE?

In response to the OP's question though, you're apparently reverting back to your alto embouchure when you play etudes on the tenor. I would suggest a practice routine that starts with long tones so you can get the feel for an embouchure that produces a good tone, and transition directly into shorter and shorter note durations. For example, play scales using whole notes at a slow tempo for your long tones. Then cut the durations in half by playing the same scales in half notes...then in 1/4 notes...then in eighth notes...then in 16th notes. As you move from one to the next (duration-wise), the embouchure and tone should remain constant. By the time you've reached playing those simple scales in 16th notes with the proper embouchure and tone, it should be easier to transition into playing etudes without reverting back to the tighter alto embouchure that you're more accustomed to. Do it all in one session though. If you work on long tones, then take a break and come back to work on etudes later, you'll probably have lost the feel for the embouchure and will likely revert back to your alto embouchure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
You could start by writing EMBOUCHURE correctly
Why didnt I think of that? Man, I sure wish I had realized sooner that correct spelling and tonal quality were related
Here we go again...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
593 Posts
im going with M-brochure.

i am basically a phonetic speller to if people sa it wrong, it gets spelled wrong.

How many people say sax-uh-phone? almost everyone i know. consequently the a.

get over it
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
im going with M-brochure.

i am basically a phonetic speller to if people sa it wrong, it gets spelled wrong.

How many people say sax-uh-phone? almost everyone i know. consequently the a.

get over it
Exactly the reason that so many kids graduating from school these days are only semi-literate...which is truly sad.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, & Forum Contributor 200
Joined
·
1,468 Posts
Its difficult to answer your question without hearing what you describe but you've realised what the problem is already . Stop clamping down on the reed with your jaw .
When you practice long tones you could try playing them at varying dynamics and working on breath support - push air through the reed without compromising your embouchure - keep an eye on intonation and play long tones through the whole range of the sax . You might need to put more than 15 mins aside though - good luck .
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top