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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. I just picked up a Conn Sax last night at an auction, and cannot figure out the serial package that is with it.

It reads:


Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I figure it's a 1935 Conn Alto. The 1119954 is the patent number. A stands for Alto. L stands for Low pitch. The serial number is M266163A. The M means M series horns. The 266163 puts it in 1935. I don't know what the last A in the serial number represents.
 

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Looks like a 6M/Transitional. There was a thread on these numbers a few weeks ago. Whatever ---you have a 'classic' --be happy!
 

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M is Conn's "Factory Code" for saxophones. They had a letter for every instrument type they made, from A for cornet to V for sarrusophone. Model numbers incorporated this, such as 6M, 10M, 12M.

All Conn saxes made from 1924-'36 had M serials, but not all are the "M series." Those are certain sax designs.

A is for Alto. It appeared on all Conn altos between ± 1932-'36. No one knows why. My guess is they wanted to track the sale of altos vs. other saxes. Probably this is the reason for M serials, too - to track saxes vs other instruments.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What I would like to know is what the second 'A' is behind the serial number. They had no reason to say Alto twice, so what's it's significance?
 

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Guessing is unavoidable with Conn. In 1970 they sold out to a new parent company, who burned the archives. There are a lot of things we will just never know.
 

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Guessing is unavoidable with Conn. In 1970 they sold out to a new parent company, who burned the archives. There are a lot of things we will just never know.
That was smart. I wonder why *******s do that? Thats not the first time I've encountered that. Im sure it was meant to do something. Ive never seen that stamping on any other ones. I was looking on eBay at others in the same serial, and year range, and none of them have it.
 

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Trashing archives serves 2 important functions for a company:
1) Space is costly.
2) No one else can benefit from your knowledge. Even if it's worthless to you, it might be gold to the competition.

I suspect mostly it's 1). Most management probably prefers not to dwell on 2), but you know it's a factor.
 

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It doesn't take a lot to compress the serials into a zip file, and keep for useful purposes. Some people could care less about the past, and all it's brought us, and only care about the future.

Not too long ago I was in a small town that had a really retro porcelain phone pod coming off the wall. It was in mint condition, but didn't have the phone. Since I love all weird, and unique things I just had to have it. I asked the guy working there about it, and he said that it hasn't been used in years, and I could probably have it, but he'd need to call the boss. He called the boss, and the boss said "I don't know, it could be worth something". The other guy said: "Well I don't know what we're gonna do with it. We have no reciept to return it for a credit". So they let me have it. It goes to show that some people recognize the past, and it's importance, while others could care less, and think that anything from the past is worthless.
 

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It doesn't take a lot to compress the serials into a zip file, and keep for useful purposes. Some people could care less about the past, and all it's brought us, and only care about the future.
I would venture a guess (Okay, I'll admit it, I was there) that there was no such thing as zip files in 1970. Actually, I wonder what a zipped punch card looks like... :mrgreen:
 

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Only altos. I can't recall seeing any Conn alto from about #253xxx, 1932, to #275xxx, 1936, that didn't have an A at the end.
 

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One possibility is that they already stamped a body with a serial number, messed up and issured it again and put an A after the second one. As to the destruction of records.....I bet it was a legal issue from McMillan and wanted to not have any old records remaining. I was in the Conn factory on Beardsley Ave. in the summer of 1970 and it was starting to look very deserted. Sad time for Elkhart. I remember the offices had the old wood framed doors with ancient windows. Glad I got to get in on the final years.
 

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I have 3 Trannys with the A behind the serial number. I believe it is like the X behind the serial number. It indicates that it is an experimantal version of the sax, and that at the time those saxes were made they had not yet settled on exactly what the final version would be........or not....who knows????
 
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