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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2011
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In my opinion, the voice is the best ear training tool. I use it when transcribing, learning tunes by ear, sight-singing, and composing. The first step was learning to match pitch with my sax and the piano, then learning to sing scales and intervals, matching bass notes with tunes, etc... Now I can't even listen to or think about music without getting my voice involved (much to the dismay of my family members).

Randy
www.randyhunterjazz.com
Online Jazz Lessons and Books
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Lessons page: www.beginningsax.com/Jazz Improv Lessons.htm
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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Singing.

  • Sing along with tracks
  • Sing the scales, long notes exercise etc. that you practice
  • Join a choir
  • Get singing lessons
  • Sing songs along with pno/gtr etc.
 

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Any tips on how to hear chords better? I can hear the root movement but i have trouble hearing the chord quality
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Any tips on how to hear chords better? I can hear the root movement but i have trouble hearing the chord quality
Do you play any keyboards? (or guitar, but keyboards is best)

You don't need to be a concert pianist, just enough to play the chord notes and move around a bit.
 

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Do you play any keyboards? (or guitar, but keyboards is best)

You don't need to be a concert pianist, just enough to play the chord notes and move around a bit.
Yeah a bit. I have piano lessons, and i play the chords of songs with rootless voicings etc. But it's still hard for me
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Yeah a bit. I have piano lessons, and i play the chords of songs with rootless voicings etc. But it's still hard for me
Rootless voicings are good for pianists, but you need the root to train yourself to hear the root quailty.

I learnt a neat way when I was at college:

Play root 3rd and 7th in left hand, then melody and any other note (e.g. 5th) in your right. It works well as a nice musical open sound.

Or I just play the cheap and cheerful way: whole chord (R 3 5 7) in LH and melody in right. Not so musical but you hear the chord at least.
 

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For hearing the chord quality, I would recommend associating the sound of those chords with songs you've heard before or associate them with a certain mood (some people think Minor chords with a major 7 sound like an old tv cop show, or minor 7 chords sound dreamy).

Also learn the predictability of the movements and bass lines while practicing the piano. Try what Pete said with the 3rds and 7ths, then sing one and play the other to hear the resolutions.
 

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Normally when i practice songs on the piano i play the bass note or walking bass in the left hand and rootless chord in the right.

For close position chord i play

G in left hand and f, a, Bb, d in my right for g minor and then

C in left hand and e, a Bb, d in my right for c7 and then

F in left hand and E, g, a, c in my right for f major

for more open i play

G left hand and Bb, d, f, a in right for g minor
C in left hand and Bbm, d, e, a in right for c7
f in left hand and a, c, e, g in right for f major

When using this for minor II- V's I use the root instead of the 9th because i cant make up my mind which one sounds better(9th or b9th). I resolve the root to the b13th for the dominant chord.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
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transcriptions :)
 
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