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Today I was playing a street festival with the Afrobeat/Funk/HipHop group I am a part of, and after our set, the other horn players and I were asked to sit in with another band playing later in the day. We decided to take them up on it, and we played the entire set with them. It easy, and a lot of fun; the band would nod at one of us when we could take a solo, and I got to play in almost every song. The only problem was, after the second song, I had to plead to the other horn player for a pair of ear plugs, because this band was pretty damn loud. Thankfully, he had an extra pair, and I was able to play the rest of the set, which I would never have done without them. I hate playing with ear plugs, because I have no idea how loud I am, of have to be, and it makes it extremely hard to communicate with the other horn players.

Is wearing ear plugs something I can get used to? Is it something I should get used to? Could you guys give me some advice for getting used to it?

I was also invited to come to rehearsals and possibly feature gigs, and I don't know whether or not I want to take them up on it. Any advice there?

I'm sorry about all the questions in this post, any input is welcome. I hope I posted this in the right section.
 

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You sould invest in musician's earplugs. These lower the decibal level across the audio range evenly. including speech. The best ones are made to your individual ear channels. You can still hear everything, just at a lower level. Get them before you damage your hearing as if you have damaged hearing you really lose those 2-4-k range and they aren't very helpful. Get the 15dB level is my advise unless your a drummer 20dB for them.
Cheers.
 

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You sould invest in musician's earplugs. These lower the decibal level across the audio range evenly. including speech. The best ones are made to your individual ear channels.
Cheers.
That's the answer. Not cheap but as you say an investment..........in preserving one's hearing. You can buy non-custom made plugs with the same filter embedded in them and these, of course, are much cheaper. Over the four years I've been using plugs my tinnitus hasn't got any worst. You do need something or pay the consequences with damaged hearing.

http://www.sensorcom.com/prodtype.asp?PT_ID=271
 

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Yeah, I have a pair of westone musician earplugs and they have different filters to lower decibel levels. They are also custom molded to your ear canal pricey but worth every cent. Good luck and best wishes.

sent from Mikey's Super Inspire 4G
 

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+1. I got these http://www.etymotic.com/hp/erme.html

I use the 9db filters and they work fine. They do take a little getting used to,but give it a little time. It's well worth it. The problem with "regular" foam earplugs is that they cut much more of the high end out than anything else, giving you a very "muffled" sound. Musician's earplugs, as mentioned above, are flat across the spectrum.
 

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Today I was playing a street festival with the Afrobeat/Funk/HipHop group I am a part of, and after our set, the other horn players and I were asked to sit in with another band playing later in the day. We decided to take them up on it, and we played the entire set with them. It easy, and a lot of fun; the band would nod at one of us when we could take a solo, and I got to play in almost every song. The only problem was, after the second song, I had to plead to the other horn player for a pair of ear plugs, because this band was pretty damn loud. Thankfully, he had an extra pair, and I was able to play the rest of the set, which I would never have done without them. I hate playing with ear plugs, because I have no idea how loud I am, of have to be, and it makes it extremely hard to communicate with the other horn players.

Is wearing ear plugs something I can get used to? Is it something I should get used to? Could you guys give me some advice for getting used to it?

I was also invited to come to rehearsals and possibly feature gigs, and I don't know whether or not I want to take them up on it. Any advice there?

I'm sorry about all the questions in this post, any input is welcome. I hope I posted this in the right section.

yes, i used to play that on a orchestra where i played... it's very strange to play with it, but is worse not to use. I always ended with the right year really really really 'tired' after playing. I was fist alto and all the trombone and trumpets and a loud drum where playing to my right side....oh... i do not miss that orchestra.
 

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i didn't knew that there was a musicians earplug, thank you for this thread. I will buy some now. I used a regular industrial earplug.
 

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I've been using Ear Plugs for 15 years. It's just part of doing business in a Guitar/Drum driven band. I take out my right earplug when soloing, otherwise, ear plugs are always in. The moment I enter the venue I plug the ears - you never know with that crazy mystery feedback will crush the ole' eardrums.
 

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I've had custom ear plugs with ER 15 for several years, you do get used to it. At first you have some difficulty because you are hearing yourself thru bone conduction but after a while it sounds more natural. It is a bit odd singing with them in, but what is your hearing worth? IIRC mine cost me about $135, but it was about 6 years ago. Put them in, and then later take them out to hear the difference and you will be might glad you have them in. ;-)
 

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....At first you have some difficulty because you are hearing yourself thru bone conduction but after a while it sounds more natural.....
True, they give you another perception of your sound because the "mix" is different.
It's also a bit harder to judge your dynamic level in comparison to others, blending can be more of a challenge.
I have the cheaper version of the musician's plugs ($15-$20) and they work very well. I won't play a loud gig or rehearsal without them anymore.
 

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i didn't knew that there was a musicians earplug, thank you for this thread. I will buy some now. I used a regular industrial earplug.
Check out the Hearos web site. They have many different models including ones for musicians.

Ron M
 

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True, they give you another perception of your sound because the "mix" is different.
It's also a bit harder to judge your dynamic level in comparison to others, blending can be more of a challenge.
I have the cheaper version of the musician's plugs ($15-$20) and they work very well. I won't play a loud gig or rehearsal without them anymore.
I have used cheap foam plugs, the $15-$20 plugs with the flanges, and my custom Westone plugs. With the custom plugs, the experience is TOTALLY different (for the better). Much more even reduction in volume, and after just a few minutes, it's pretty comfortable to figure out volume.

I've had the Westones for a few years now, and I'm about to go get a new pair (leaving the old pair in my tenor case, which is the horn I gig on most).
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you all so much! These posts have put a great deal of my fears at ease, and I will definitely invest in them... Is there anything I SHOULDN'T get?
 
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