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I've noticed some people using pdf's of tunes. Are these one tune per pdf file, or are they like the Real Book pdf's that I've had forever which have the entire book on one pdf file? It would seem that one tune per pdf file would be a lot easier to manage, though one would lose the the functionality of the index at the front of the book. Anyway, I'm curious which format people use, and if it's one tune per pdf file, then did they have a means to cut apart a book-long pdf file of tunes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
I use both. I keep books in a single large pdf (like the Real Book) and individual tunes in individual pdfs. The latter make it easier to then pull only a few tunes into a separate folder to create set lists.

On Mac it’s pretty easy to drag pdf pages into or out of larger pdf files. Not sure how that works on Windows.
 

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Keilwerth saxes (S/A/T), Selmer clarinets (S/B), Altus Azumi flute
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Anyway, I'm curious which format people use, and if it's one tune per pdf file, then did they have a means to cut apart a book-long pdf file of tunes.
On Mac it's pretty easy to drag pdf pages into or out of larger pdf files. Not sure how that works on Windows.
On either platform, you can always cut a pdf into separate documents by using a pdf printer driver.

Just do what you would normally do to print a file (e.g., open the file in Adobe Reader or whatever, and hit CTRL+P), then go to the printer settings and select one of the PDF printers (e.g., it might have a name like "Microsoft Print to PDF" or "Such and such PDF Printer") and select the pages that you want in your separate file. When you hit "OK", it will prompt you for a filename to save it to a file. The resulting file will be a PDF with just the pages that you want.
 

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I've noticed some people using pdf's of tunes. Are these one tune per pdf file, or are they like the Real Book pdf's that I've had forever which have the entire book on one pdf file? It would seem that one tune per pdf file would be a lot easier to manage, though one would lose the the functionality of the index at the front of the book. Anyway, I'm curious which format people use, and if it's one tune per pdf file, then did they have a means to cut apart a book-long pdf file of tunes.
Actual music reader apps can use bookmarks or indexes for direct access to any page or pages within a single large pdf without splitting. This is how I manage dozens of fake books on my tablet with virtually no extra steps or effort.

I can and do use single PDFs per tunes and large PDFs with hundreds of tunes, whatever my source happens to be originally.
 

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Just a question, maybe I missed it in the thread, are there ebooks with a footswitch to turn pages or move to bookmarks?
 

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There are many Bluetooth page turner foot pedals on the market which should work fine. Just add another hundred bucks or so.

I've tried many, and my favorite is the AirTurn BT200 S-2. It's the only one whose buttons I can feel through my shoes. Others have flat, mushy pedals that I have to look down to find every time I need to turn.
 

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I've tried many, and my favorite is the AirTurn BT200 S-2. It's the only one whose buttons I can feel through my shoes. Others have flat, mushy pedals that I have to look down to find every time I need to turn.
I use the PageFlip Firefly: PageFlip Firefly (you can get it at Amazon and other places too).

Works great - bluetooth and usb. You're right that about not feeling it through shoes though.

They also make a "Butterfly" which is bluetooth only, no usb and a "Dragonfly" which is bluetooth/usb AND has 4 buttons instead of the 2 on the Firefly
 

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I use the PageFlip Firefly: PageFlip Firefly (you can get it at Amazon and other places too).

Works great - bluetooth and usb. You're right that about not feeling it through shoes though.

They also make a "Butterfly" which is bluetooth only, no usb and a "Dragonfly" which is bluetooth/usb AND has 4 buttons instead of the 2 on the Firefly
That's the first one I tried. Never could master it. Always had to look down before turning. Glad it works for you.
 

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Actual music reader apps can use bookmarks or indexes for direct access to any page or pages within a single large pdf without splitting. This is how I manage dozens of fake books on my tablet with virtually no extra steps or effort.

I can and do use single PDFs per tunes and large PDFs with hundreds of tunes, whatever my source happens to be originally.
Thanks, and thanks to mmichel. I can see that someday soon I'll have to enter the twenty-first century.
 

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I use an normal sized iPad 2 and have scanned or downloaded all of my books in pdf. The problem with scanning to pdf is that there is no text information in the file. I found indexes online for most of the books and wrote a script that adds the indexes to the pdf files. So when I open the pdf, I have a searchable, clickable table of contents listing all of the tunes in the book...the problem is that I don't have an overall index to tell me which book a given tune is in. I know iGigBook probably does just that, but I am almost there. I just need a way to search a set of pdf's for a given tune on an iPad. That can't be hard.

In playing situations I like the small iPad form factor. I keep it on a low stand a few feet away. Because it's backlighted, it is easier to read in the dark and that compensates for its size. It's also inconspicuous and hardly noticeable compared to a music stand. It would be better to know all of the standards that might ever be called, and someday I will get there, but every city/club tends to have its own set of favorite tunes.

If I weren't using an iPad, I would use a Surface Pro, which my kids use. It's a full-fledged Windows 10 laptop/tablet with a large screen, removeable keyboard, long battery life, very thin and light, with wifi, bluetooth, and a USB port. Also not expensive ($300-$850), depending on which processor you get.
 

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I use an normal sized iPad 2 and have scanned or downloaded all of my books in pdf. The problem with scanning to pdf is that there is no text information in the file. I found indexes online for most of the books and wrote a script that adds the indexes to the pdf files. So when I open the pdf, I have a searchable, clickable table of contents listing all of the tunes in the book...the problem is that I don't have an overall index to tell me which book a given tune is in. I know iGigBook probably does just that, but I am almost there. I just need a way to search a set of pdf's for a given tune on an iPad. That can't be hard.

In playing situations I like the small iPad form factor. I keep it on a low stand a few feet away. Because it's backlighted, it is easier to read in the dark and that compensates for its size. It's also inconspicuous and hardly noticeable compared to a music stand. It would be better to know all of the standards that might ever be called, and someday I will get there, but every city/club tends to have its own set of favorite tunes.

If I weren't using an iPad, I would use a Surface Pro, which my kids use. It's a full-fledged Windows 10 laptop/tablet with a large screen, removeable keyboard, long battery life, very thin and light, with wifi, bluetooth, and a USB port. Also not expensive ($300-$850), depending on which processor you get.
Yeah this is basically what iGig Book does. It takes a bit of time to configure but if you play in the type of environment where folks are just calling tunes and you aren't working off some pre-defined standard set list of tunes you always play, iGig Book is worth the effort.
 

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If I weren't using an iPad, I would use a Surface Pro, which my kids use. It's a full-fledged Windows 10 laptop/tablet with a large screen, removeable keyboard, long battery life, very thin and light, with wifi, bluetooth, and a USB port. Also not expensive ($300-$850), depending on which processor you get.
I basically use the Lenovo version of a Surface Pro. But the keyboard folds back. The reason I didn't go with an actual Surface Pro was the iPad sized screen (10.6"), too small for my old eyes. My Lenovo is 14", or letter sized, much easier for me to read. Neither works in full sun like an e-ink tablet though. But of my last 30 or so reading gigs, only one was in full sun where the tablet was unreadable. I just used my paper backup in that case. So I can live with that trade-off.

I do highly recommend some sort of music reading app though. They're only a few bucks and make life much, much easier. There's no good reason to reinvent the wheel.
 

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The reason I didn't go with an actual Surface Pro was the iPad sized screen (10.6"), too small for my old eyes. My Lenovo is 14", or letter sized, much easier for me to read.
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I do highly recommend some sort of music reading app though. They're only a few bucks and make life much, much easier. There's no good reason to reinvent the wheel.
Surface Pro screen is 12.3", which is almost letter-paper sized. Pretty good sized compared to a standard ipad. I don't like that it's unrepairable, can't be upgraded, and basically disposable, but ours has lasted several years so far with no issues. I would definitely get this over an iPad Pro.

On the music reading app, I reinvented the wheel because I wanted to have cross-platform compatibility (ipad/iphone/windows/mac). I have built the TOC into the pdf files, so any platform will work. I know the apps are probably faster and nicer and more capable, and I will probably get one. I've been caught not finding tunes fast enough on stage. Looks like iGigBook is a little over half the cost of a Legere reed.
 

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Surface Pro screen is 12.3", which is almost letter-paper sized. Pretty good sized compared to a standard ipad. I don't like that it's unrepairable, can't be upgraded, and basically disposable, but ours has lasted several years so far with no issues. I would definitely get this over an iPad Pro.

On the music reading app, I reinvented the wheel because I wanted to have cross-platform compatibility (ipad/iphone/windows/mac). I have built the TOC into the pdf files, so any platform will work. I know the apps are probably faster and nicer and more capable, and I will probably get one. I've been caught not finding tunes fast enough on stage. Looks like iGigBook is a little over half the cost of a Legere reed.
I can understand that. Having some of the additional functionality of a Surface would be nice. However, a few of the clubs we play don't like bands playing off regular music stands but they tolerate the tablet holders which are less obtrusive.

Being a programmer you're a good candidate for iGig Book. The app gets mixed reviews mostly because at the beginning he released it half-baked and it requires some customization to get things just right. I'm a networking expert and have an MS in Computer Science but trying to create a custom searchable index for tunes outside of the Fake/Real books (mostly stuff written by band members) was a bridge too far for me. Having a basic understanding of data structures, keys, indexing, etc.. is pretty helpful with this app if you want to customize it. That being said, it works really well once you get it set up right.
 

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Years ago, I made an index in excel with every tune from every fake book I had. I put a hyperlink on each title that opened the exact page in Acrobat in whatever book it was in. I also made 26 buttons across the top to jump to any letter. I could make set lists that way too. So I never had to hunt through the index on a gig. This was way before any music reader apps existed. I also built apps for my palm pilot and pocket PC decades ago that was a chord reference, on-screen electronic piano, metronome and did midi recording and playback. I kick myself for not porting them over to iOS or turning my excel sheet into an integrated music reader app.
 

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Got a question regarding e-ink specifically. Is it possible to change the color of the paper?

I have found (and research supports) that the best contrast display on my computer is black text on a very light yellow background - think the color of old-school music paper. I have many e-books that I read on my iPad and have set my readers (Kindle and Google Play Books) to use this scheme. I do find it helps to keep my eyes from getting tired, which black text on white does very quickly.

I also use this scheme in my day job, for my programmer's editors and console colors. All the other programmers have gone to the "dark" side, I guess it's in style now, but having tried those styles for several days, I prefer the light yellow with black text scheme.

Just curious if the e-ink display can do this.
 

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Got a question regarding e-ink specifically. Is it possible to change the color of the paper?
My Boox Lumi Max can do that. I like to have it on an "old yellow" kind of setting. This is done using two lighting controls, one for brightness and the other contrast called "mixed color temperature adjustment." I find it quite restful when reading... :)
 

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My Boox Lumi Max can do that. I like to have it on an "old yellow" kind of setting. This is done using two lighting controls, one for brightness and the other contrast called "mixed color temperature adjustment." I find it quite restful when reading... :)
Yeah. It's worth emphasizing that changing the color of the "paper" doesn't really make sense. The screen is purely reflective (opaque), like a real sheet of paper. Unlike other computer displays (e.g., OLED or LCD) color is not created by backlighting through colored filters.

What @mark5009 describes above is the adjustable frontlighting, which allows you to change the color temperature of the (reflective) lights built into the display. Of course you could accomplish the same thing by, say, reading under an incandescent lamp (or an LED lamp designed to have a "warm" color temperature).

If reading black text on an actual sheet of white paper doesn't bother you, then reading these screens shouldn't either.
 

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My Boox Lumi Max can do that. I like to have it on an "old yellow" kind of setting. This is done using two lighting controls, one for brightness and the other contrast called "mixed color temperature adjustment." I find it quite restful when reading... :)
Yeah, I know what you mean. When I was playing shows, I always appreciated the acts that paid for good copyists who used high quality "parchment colored" paper.

Yeah. It's worth emphasizing that changing the color of the "paper" doesn't really make sense. The screen is purely reflective (opaque), like a real sheet of paper. Unlike other computer displays (e.g., OLED or LCD) color is not created by backlighting through colored filters.

What @mark5009 describes above is the adjustable frontlighting, which allows you to change the color temperature of the (reflective) lights built into the display. Of course you could accomplish the same thing by, say, reading under an incandescent lamp (or an LED lamp designed to have a "warm" color temperature).

If reading black text on an actual sheet of white paper doesn't bother you, then reading these screens shouldn't either.
On a stage, I prefer the parchment style paper, as described above. Nowadays, reading gigs have computer printed music on standard letter paper, so for my old, tired eyes it's a double whammy - smaller sheets and white paper. Of course, lots of bands (those with gigs, anyway) have tablets for the music, which I guess is OK, if one can control the background color.

I understand now that the e-ink background is not electronically produced, but the front lighting might be interesting.

But I'm probably not going to buy an e-ink tablet, I still use a pencil when writing music, unless producing parts for others. Which is quite a comedown for a guy that spent 4 years writing notation software (Encore, now sadly defunct).
 
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