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Discussion Starter #1
I've been a happy user of the DV for some time now. I've come to realize lately with my teacher that my high D and up are way sharp. I can not loosen up enough to bring it down without losing the note altogether. I am using it on a Yamaha 82Z UL. I took a Selmer SA80-II on trial and it was a little better. However, I put a hard rubber mouthpiece on both horns and the notes came in tune. Could this be some kind of defect in my particular DV or is it just a side effect of metal pieces in general? I don't want to have to give up the DV as I love how I sound on it.
 

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I doubt anything is wrong with the mouthpiece but have another player play it if you could and see what they think.

as you lip it down to try and get it in tune add more pressure from the sides of your mouth to try and keep note together. Open up your throat more and keep trying.
 

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The material is not causing it, it is probably either the high baffle or just that you are not flexible enough with your pitch (if you are super pitch flexible, sorry). Try doing some pitch bends. Also, what hard rubber mouthpiece did you use? If it was something like a C*, the intonation change could be drastic.
 

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Yeah it's a throat thing. Think AHHHH. when playing those notes not EEEEE. That will open your throat and allow the pitch to come down.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The rubber piece is a Morgan Jazz 6M. I also have an Excaliber 6E that plays really nice.

I appreciate the tips and concepts regarding opening my throat. I'll try working on that.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What do you mean by mouthpiece target pitch?
 

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I used to play a DV on alto and I got rid of it for precisely this reason. The fact is, you can learn to adjust and bring those notes in tune, but with that high baffle, you'll never get as good intonation as you will with a more natural piece like a Morgan. The other problem with the DV is the very long facing curve. This feature has certain advantages, but I always felt it made the intonation much harder to control. I was able to keep those high notes in tune after working on it for a while, but only with a lot of adjustment. In the end, it just wasn't worth it.
 
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