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Discussion Starter #1
I searched for this topic but didn't get a hit so I have to assume that the subject hasn't been raised or its been called a different name.

This is a slow desease which shows up as hand pain in the early stages but progresses to cause your fingers to curl inwards. You can play a clarinet and sax longer than you can play a piano.

In any case I have the desease and I'm wondering if anyone in this forum has a similar problem, have they had any remedial treatment and if so what was the treatment, recovery time and the outcome etc.

Up until recently the treatment was surgery or more more recenty needle aponevrotomy (NA). The link below will give you the details of the desease and these remedies - there is no cure.

I recently applied for a new treatment in which some enzyme (or such stuff) is injected into the site and 'eats' the promlem tissue away - supposedly all fixed the next day in many cases. Problem was mine's severe enough to prevent playing a piano but not bad enough to be suitable for an experimental drug trial.

Has anyone on this forum heard of the treatment and its availability. Usually drug trials in the US are further advanced than in Australia, and often over here we seem to do extended trials even after your FDA is satisfied.


http://www.dupuytrenscenter.com/dupuytrenscenter

Thanks
Jim W
 

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The problem is a mechanical one. The tendon that flexes the finger becomes fixed in the tendon sheath in the palm of the hand. The fixture stops the finger from fully extending. It is a simple operation to release the tendon from the sheath and that, is in effect, a cure.

For the timing of the operation - it should be done before the fixed flexion has been there long enough to stop the joint of the finger regaining full range of movement. As soon as the problem affects everyday function, then it is time to do something about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Chris J,
Thanks for your response. Normally I wouldn't give a 'no you're on the wrong track' response but in this case the problem is close at hand (excuse the pun). I really only have about 2 years before I become a full time listener or otherwise have to take some drastic steps. I'm trying to make sure the steps are the right ones

Dupuytrens has no relationship to carpal tunnel problems to which I think you are referring. Its a 'skin substrate' problem where the stuff under the skin sort of 'calluses' and causes some fingers to be pulled closed.

Try this experiment. Open the palm of your hand so as to flatten the skin. Now use the finger of the other hand to try to move the skin around. It doesn't move about much at all; at least not like the skin on your under arm or stomach etc. So if this under skin stuff somehow gets a scarlike constricting growth in it, it will ultimately causes your fingers to close. In my case I think playing piano has extended the onset because the area where my hand meets the wrist has also constricted.

Anyway it's a @*&%^$+ desease to have. There is no cure only short to medium term remidies before the thing creeps up on you again.

With about 4 in 100 persons of northern europeans descent likely to be suffers, I just thought this site a good spot to seek some input.

Again apologies - no offence meant.

Regards
JimW
 

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The problem Chris J mentioned sounds more like "trigger finger, which is a mechanical problem with the tendon sheath and is surgically correctable. I'm considering having it done to my left hand; the right was done five years ago. Really sorry about the contracture, JimWE. A clarinetist friend suffers from it and uses a special clarinet with extensions on the left keys for the little finger. Not to be a smartass -- have you thought about taking up the trombone?
 

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I've had this problem and had it operated on about 6 years ago. My Dupuytrens got to the stage where I kept catching my finger when I tried to put my hand in my pocket. I had to wear a splint for a few months after the surgery. The Dupuytrens appears to be all gone now and I've got a great scar but my mobility is terrific.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
shotgun said:
The problem Chris J mentioned sounds more like "trigger finger, which is a mechanical problem with the tendon sheath and is surgically correctable. I'm considering having it done to my left hand; the right was done five years ago. Really sorry about the contracture, JimWE. A clarinetist friend suffers from it and uses a special clarinet with extensions on the left keys for the little finger. Not to be a smartass -- have you thought about taking up the trombone?
What? Drop the cool reed pipe for blowing respberries. I've actually thought of that and it's an option. Thanks.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Elsdad said:
I've had this problem and had it operated on about 6 years ago. My Dupuytrens got to the stage where I kept catching my finger when I tried to put my hand in my pocket. I had to wear a splint for a few months after the surgery. The Dupuytrens appears to be all gone now and I've got a great scar but my mobility is terrific.

Glad to hear your operation was a success. The problem I have is that surgeons don't seem to want to operate until they absolutely have to and by then the problem has been affecting your playing and enjoyment for a few years.

I'm really hanging out for this new injection treaqtment but can't get much information on it. The doc doing the medical trial seems to want cases that are similar to yours and needs mine to progress before I'm suitable.

Seems that they inject this stuff that eats the constricture and then the next day reflex your finger and 'snap' it pops open and you have full movement in most cases. I just can't find any more about the treatment and the trial people are not greatly helpful except to say that in 4 or 5 years it will be a comon procedure. I'd like it now so I can get back to playing the kbd.

Thanks for the positive feedback on the surgery approach.
 

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Dupuytren's

Hi Jim W,

there are different names to this disease, that might be the reason why you didn't find many references. You will find further ones by searching for "Dupuytren's" or "Dupuytren's contracture". Dupuytren Society runs a good site with infos on therapies, including addresses in Australia: www.dupuytren-online.info . They also provide a forum specifically for Dupuytren's and Ledderhose disease : http://www.dupuytren-online.info/Forum_English/

Wolfgang
jwarner said:
I searched for this topic but didn't get a hit so I have to assume that the subject hasn't been raised or its been called a different name.

This is a slow desease which shows up as hand pain in the early stages but progresses to cause your fingers to curl inwards. You can play a clarinet and sax longer than you can play a piano.

In any case I have the desease and I'm wondering if anyone in this forum has a similar problem, have they had any remedial treatment and if so what was the treatment, recovery time and the outcome etc.

...

Thanks
Jim W
 

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Hi good forum people. I've been dealing with Dupes for about 7 or 8 years. It took about 1 year for it to be properly diagnosed, as I don't fit the profile of the usual patient.
It is a hardening of the palmar fascia which is the layer of skin between the outer layer of skin and the tendons. Here's more:

http://www.dupuytrenscenter.com/dupuytrenscenter/Dupuytrens.htm

I also have the knuckle pads which I've found more annoying.

Factors:Genetic - yes Northern European descent (although I quite a few generations of Aussie), average age is 50 when it appears & 70% (if I'm remembering right) of cases are male. However if you are a Type 1 diabetic (me for 23 years), you are 30% more likely to get it.
My father has it - I diagnosed him - and he had an operation to cut the cords in his right hand. It was successful and my Dad is happy with the results (he isn't a musician).

How it has affected me:
I can't wear my wedding ring so I got a wedding ring tattoo instead about 6 years ago!
I'm a professional woodwind player and when the knuckle pads first appeared it was painful - i couldn't knock on a door - and I got hand therapy that helped. It has been developing quickly for the first 3 years, then it was in remission for a while, but around 3 weeks ago a really big knuckle pad that had been developing in the base of my octave key thumb, has started annoying me, mostly on bari. I have a new Selmer low C bass clarinet that I'm working on making the stretches for certain keys.
So I'll be off to the doctor again soon..
Will let you know what they say..
Best of luck to anyone who has to deal with this..
 

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I just wanted to chime in. I ws just recently diagnosed with Dup(sp) constricture. I hope you don't mind that I'm not a musician, but do love Jazz/Sax, and have that cool app on my Droid phone "Iheartradio", streaming jazz, sax and smooth, with no commercials on the Smooth Jazz Station that I can tell. Anyways, recently diagnosed, female, 52. I did read that trauma can start this, my husband hit my hand in February, and that's when it seemed to start growing. My doctor doesn't know about the trauma thing. I'm writing a book, and from all the use/activity, my hand seems to start hurting and swelling after awhile. I have no choice but to stop and let it rest. I'm sure the typing is going to make it sore after awhile. Does anyone take any pain pills for this? My heart goes out to you, music has got to be one of the purest forms of expression. Hope you all well. Oh yes, my Dr. said that my National Heritage, Scottish, and some other Baltic breeds, is what is handed :) down. He talked about the Australian thing as well, but no lineage there. My roots go back to William of Wallace. Would really love to visit my Country of Heritage.
Keep up the good work, and my thoughts will be with you all.
Renee
P.S. I was born in Hollywood California, so a US person.
 

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After I broke my finger, I have been diagnosed with Dupuytren in my left hand. For now it seems stable, and I have no problem playing. I hope it stays like that.
 

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I have had Dupie's for a couple of years. it affects the pinky finger of my right (dominant) hand. It has progressed over the last year, but it hasn't limited me in any way so far. Keeping my fingers crossed :lol::lol:
 

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I'm 48 and recently had this diagnosed in my right hand. It is very early stage and the cord is not visible but can be felt by running a finger along it. I visited the doctor because at first i thought it I might be a tendon irritated / swollen. I'd like to know how fast this is likely to progress, if anyone can relate that to me. Of course it varies a lot, but still...
 

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Hi all:
I have a friend of mine who had Dupuytren's Contracture and after some research I found in Paris a Medical Doctor who specializes in Dup' Contracture and makes the Needle aponeurothomy procedure.
He went to Paris and was treated by this Doctor.
The needle procedure is very effective on the early stages of the disease.
This is a genetic disease thay is suffered by the Vikings descendents.
If you are interested I can find the Doctor's Name and Phone.
Best Wishes
Humbardi
 

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Hi:
The specialist in the needle aponeurothomy to treat Dupuytren's Contracture is Dr. Lermosieaux in Paris.
My friend was treated by him.
Yo can read more about , here:
http://www.henrilellouche.com/dupuytrenen.php
Best Wishes
Humbardi
 

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Elecmuso :
May you contact the center in France asking if they have trained any medical doctor in Australia to make the procedure ? my friend is from Greece and all his life he has been working with his hands as a mold maker in Plastics industry.He had his hands as the pictures shown in the webpage, and after the treatment he got his fingers straight again and with full function.
Dr. Lermosieaux has more than 20 years doing this procedure and is known as one of the best in the world.
Best Wishes
Humbardi
 

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If I do nor remember bad, the cost of the Doctor´s fee was something like 80 Euros.....!!!
Humbardi
 
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