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The D chamber was his most popular chamber. The S chamber being smaller more compact sounding, M being medium chamber and L was his large chamber model. I have owned and played his D, S and he had an SP chamber which I really liked. A lot of guys favored his D chamber and I think it was his most popular one at the time
 

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You are welcome. Not exactly sure what the D stands for... I think it could just be like Bobby Dukoffs personal chamber mouthpiece, or maybe since it is D as in his last name like one of the first models he introduced or the first in his series or line of pieces
 

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Primarily Tenor with occasional Alto
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At some point there was also an X chamber made too.
 

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The D chamber was his most popular chamber. The S chamber being smaller more compact sounding, M being medium chamber and L was his large chamber model. I have owned and played his D, S and he had an SP chamber which I really liked. A lot of guys favored his D chamber and I think it was his most popular one at the time
All through the 1970s and 80s the standard go-to mouthpiece for rock tenor players was a Dukoff D7 or D8 with a Selmer soprano ligature to replace the cruddy Dukoff lig. A lot of jazz players also used the same setup for tenor, especially in the loud bands typical of the era. I bought mine in 1981 or thereabouts from H&H Music in downtown Houston.

In the same period most alto players I knew were playing Claude Lakey for jazz and big band work, and many were on the Dukoff D for the "Sanborn sound".

At least, these were the trends in Texas at the time.
 
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