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Discussion Starter #1
I accidentally dropped my metal tenor Brancher mouthpiece on a concrete floor yesterday. Caused me some major goosebumps and my heart definitely missed some beats.
Fortunately it wasn't a high drop. Maybe 15 cm. But still the tip on the right side is dented slightly.

It's very minor, but visible to the naked eye. I haven’t played it on the horn yet since is happened after a practice session. I just played the mouthpiece alone, and sound came out.
Can I safely remove the abrasion with some sort of file? Or should I look for are mouthpiece refacer?
It is my main piece.

I’m always very careful with mouthpieces, still sh*t happens.
Before I do anything to the MPC, I’ll play test it tonight.
Any advice is welcome.
 

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Play it see what happened, you can’t just file it off, maybe nothing happened, maybe all happened.

The good thing is that they are not Hugely expensive. I wouldn’t have it repaired because it will be a different piece anyway.

I own a J27.

Sometimes they are as cheap as €150. Otherwise mail Pascal Brancher see what he says .

[email protected]

this is the Belgian distributor ( see if they have one that has some cosmetic problem sometimes they lose the plating and they have to be sent back)

• Algam Benelux
Ankerrui 20
Antwerpen 2000
Belgium
www.algambenelux.be
 

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I accidentally dropped my metal tenor Brancher mouthpiece on a concrete floor yesterday. Caused me some major goosebumps and my heart definitely missed some beats.
Fortunately it wasn't a high drop. Maybe 15 cm. But still the tip on the right side is dented slightly.

It's very minor, but visible to the naked eye. I haven’t played it on the horn yet since is happened after a practice session. I just played the mouthpiece alone, and sound came out.
Can I safely remove the abrasion with some sort of file? Or should I look for are mouthpiece refacer?
It is my main piece.

I’m always very careful with mouthpieces, still sh*t happens.
Before I do anything to the MPC, I’ll play test it tonight.
Any advice is welcome.
Definitely don’t panic, I’ve seen some very messed up looking mouthpieces play great and I’ve seen quite a few. Messed up rails, uneven facings, casting marks, all kinds of stuff. One of the best mouthpieces I’ve ever played had uneven rails in both directions. The only thing that matters is how it plays, nothing else. In fact, your mouthpiece might even play better now. The question is, can you be detached from the tiny dent to judge it? Phil Barone
 

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By all means do not touch it yourself. Post a close-up if you can. A flat spot on the tip is going to push up a little ridge on the flat of the tip rail, the most sensitive part of the mouthpiece. Since this is a current production mouthpiece, you will find that the most cost-effective remedy is to replace it. In the hands of an expert wearing high-magnification lenses the little ridge can be flattened but essentially it is impossible to make the mouthpiece 'like-new'.
 

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I had the same thing happen to my Vandoren V16. Definite dent in the left corner of the tip. No difference in the sound or response that I can detect.
 

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Little dings, and marks in metal mouthpieces are super easy to clean up.

The only thing you have to watch for is stuff on the tip rail. If there's a nick in the tip rail it can cause your reeds to split.

I've repaired at least a dozen poor looking or misshaped tips over the years. And they always turned out playing better than when I started.

Yours might not need anything at all.
 

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First play it

If there is no difference dont mess with it.

If you are willing to risk messing with it do NOT use a file.

Those things are fixed with sandpaper in the same method one faces a piece. A file is likely to remove way too much.

If its messed up dont remove excess material because if you decide to have it professionally repaired the less you screw up a repair the better the results when professionally repaired.

One of the biggest problems with drops is that brass is pretty soft. It can twist the facing on the side it was dropped on making it really crooked....or it may not do anything. A 15 cm drop isnt that much impact. Brancher metal is tougher than Link brass. Link brass is super soft and you can literally tap one repeatedly and firmly on a hard surface and move the facing near the tip.

There is a pretty good chance you will be fine with it as is.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all your advice so far!
Well…it plays! That’s positive.
It could be my imagination, but I feel that it is slightly more resistant and plays not as bright as before.
It is exactly as 1saxman says. The tip was hit and a little ridge on the flat of the tip rail has been pushed up ever so slightly.

So, I will not use a file. Since most of you say “replace it”, I can take the chance to try and tap out the ridge with very light force. If it works, fine. If not, it needed replacing anyway.
Or I can go to a repair shop. There aren’t many around in my area. But I found this one:
https://dequelery.nl
They are based in the Netherlands, Vlissingen.
May be Milandro has some insights in this shop?

I will try to take a picture tonight.
 

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it's a well known shop but I don’t see how they would “ repair” your piece without changing it even further than it has been already. They wouldn’t even have a reference of how it was before it was dropped!

There are many general repair shops (like that one) which also say they work on mouthpieces but I am not aware of any person with a serious track record in that department. There is also a shop in the east of the country which makes mouthpieces and I wouldn’t bring my mouthpiece to them to have it fixed.

If I would consider such thing I would send it to the maker in France and if they would offer me to get the mouthpiece back and pay an extra fee to get a new one I certainly would replace the old with a new. There is nothing magic YET with any Brancher, they are made by a current maker and current production is made the same way as few years ago when they started.

I would, as I told you, get in touch with the Belgian importer in your own town, they may be able to do for you way more than you may expect. Pascal Brancher himself (the maker) may do this and both can offer you a replacement.

There is nothing magic in a mouthpiece that is currently produced to suppose that it would be better to spend quite a bit of money in “ repairing” it (which most probably will result in someone making look like nothing has happened ).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks Milandro!
I will contact the importer. See what they can do for me.
 

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Well, if you are thinking about repairing the thing yourself, you need some fine grit wet-or-dry paper (600 grit or higher number, I would probably use one of the super high grits like 1200 or 2000) and a known flat surface (plate glass is usually used).

I would probably use a black marker to mark the entire surface of the side and tip rails, then very gently work down the little bump till the area where the black is being sanded off blends into the rest. Too little material removal is better than too much.

If you don't have the capability to do fine hand work and take your time, don't mess with it.
 

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First play it



One of the biggest problems with drops is that brass is pretty soft. It can twist the facing on the side it was dropped on making it really crooked....or it may not do anything. A 15 cm drop isnt that much impact. Brancher metal is tougher than Link brass. Link brass is super soft and you can literally tap one repeatedly and firmly on a hard surface and move the facing near the tip.

.
But nothing's as soft as the mystery meat Dukoffs are made out of. You can practically change the facing by breathing on the thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'll try to post some pictures soon...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Interesting update.
As Milandro suggested, I emailed the importer and the Brancher Company directly and guess what?

Pascal Brancher himself contacted me half an hour later, suggested to send him the mouthpiece so they can try to repair it for free!
Wow. That is some service indeed. I’m quite speechless.
 

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Well, this is the advantage of having to do with a small maker who takes his business seriously.

I’ve met mr. Brancher a few times in Frankfurt and I respect him.

I have received similar service from many brands ( not to do with saxophones) Victorinox Samsonite for example they replaced, for free, items which were long past their guarantee terms.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks again Milandro for your great suggestion.
 

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Or I can go to a repair shop. There aren’t many around in my area. But I found this one:
https://dequelery.nl
They are based in the Netherlands, Vlissingen.
May be Milandro has some insights in this shop?

I will try to take a picture tonight.
I saw that milandro's suggestion worked well for you and hope the repair will work out well, so below is just for your information:

Ko Zuidweg has a mouthpiece repaire shop. He is close to Middelburg (Zeeland), so not far from you. He is a very good player too.
http://www.kozuidwegmouthpieces.com/refacing.html
 
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