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The traditional geographical distinction is that Britain is NOT part of Europe. This predates the EU by centuries. British traditions are substantially different than Continental traditions in a lot of ways, mostly stemming from the fact that France, Italy, Spain were all closely knit parts of the Roman Empire whereas Britain was a distant loosely held province and Roman ways had much less influence. This has a lot to do with why in many ways British culture is more similar to German than to French or Spanish; because of course most of what is now Germany was never conquered by Rome, and of course the Vikings, Angles, and Saxons were Germanic peoples who settled in Britain over the course of the centuries.

In flute land, British flutists and German flutists kept to wooden closed hole Boehm-pattern flutes far longer than the French who adopted early on the silver open hole Louis Lot pattern, and the traditional "English flute tone" was closer to the traditional "German flute tone" and distinct from the French school flute tone. It looks, from what's posted above, that there was a similar dichotomy between British oboe practice and design and Continental practice and design.
 

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And clarinets (at least Boehm style) all have a ringkey with hole, AND a thumb key, so they certainly don't have any kind of "rest point" for the thumb unlike a saxophone.
 
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