Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey folks, I am mainly an alto sax player. I have a soprano sax, but only play around with it. The thing is my band director wants me to play tenor sax. I am wondering if that would mess up tone on alto sax. I think I have a pretty bright sound, I am still trying to work on it to sound like kirk whalum. I am wondering if playing the tenor will cause my sound on alto worse!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,517 Posts
It will take some work trying to switch back and forth. Escpicially since your mouth is not used to it. However once you can devolep an embouchure for Tenor and Alto combination it is easy to switch. I can do it all day long it is really that easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Okay so after a while, so will the playing the tenor actually help with my sound on alto?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,875 Posts
iceman said:
Okay so after a while, so will the playing the tenor actually help with my sound on alto?
For me it does. I find playing both to be mutually helpful.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,517 Posts
Since I am assuming that you have never really played Tenor. Many people here, myself included feel that the Tenor is an easier horn to express yourself on. I feel that Tenor is more of a sexier horn that Alto. And its just the sound. The goal for a Tenor in Classical playing is for it to sound like a Cello, and for Alto you want to sound like a French Horn.
I too find that playing different sized instruments is mutaully helpful with playing. Except when it is time to buy reeds, then it just becomes down right expensive!!! Also note that switching from Alto to Tenor or to Soprano you will need to learn the key's for tunning if you want to play with any type of band.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I agree with Carbs... playing jazz is way too easy on tenor. I fell in love with her way too late in my sax studies. And altissimo sounds so sweet (and is so easy to produce, it's not even funny). I, however, did have "sax lag" whenever I switched over instruments. I would get stuck thinking in Alto when playing tenor and vice-versa. But that goes away after a while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Well I actually saw the seat I made in the Concert band. I was mistaken, I thought I was going on to tenor. I am on Baritone Saxophone, which is huge and different. The only cool part about it is that I don't have to worry about the keys since the Bari and Alto are tuned in the same key.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
Carbs said:
Since I am assuming that you have never really played Tenor. Many people here, myself included feel that the Tenor is an easier horn to express yourself on. I feel that Tenor is more of a sexier horn that Alto. And its just the sound. The goal for a Tenor in Classical playing is for it to sound like a Cello, and for Alto you want to sound like a French Horn.
I too find that playing different sized instruments is mutaully helpful with playing. Except when it is time to buy reeds, then it just becomes down right expensive!!! Also note that switching from Alto to Tenor or to Soprano you will need to learn the key's for tunning if you want to play with any type of band.
I'd say in classical playing you want a saxophone to sound like a saxophone. It has a very distinct classical sound - that's why there are thousands of solo pieces written for us. You may want to make a sax emulate a string instrument in certain cases, but never always like something it isn't.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,517 Posts
Sorry I ment,
that in many setting if you are playing a Solo on Tenor, if it is classical then it was probably written for a Cello, and in which case if it is a solo it should emulate a Cello.
If it is not a Solo or Jazz then you can make it sound like what you want to an extent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
653 Posts
Bari-Alto, Embochure differences

iceman said:
Well I actually saw the seat I made in the Concert band. I was mistaken, I thought I was going on to tenor. I am on Baritone Saxophone, which is huge and different. The only cool part about it is that I don't have to worry about the keys since the Bari and Alto are tuned in the same key.
I've been playing bari now since May after not playing since high school days (41 years ago), and recently got the bug to play alto, in addition (and am awaiting the recent results of this bug and related GAS :D , i.e., a new but smaller axe for its soon to be bretheren bari). I last played alto in Jr. HS. Anyhow, i borrowed an alto from a friend and i was able to get along quite nicely, except for the high notes starting at high D. When i went from that to playing bari (in the same session) there was no problem on the bari - i find bari is easiest to play, takes less effort in terms of embochure, lung power, etc. When i went back to the alto (in the same session), i initially had difficulty getting the same sound i had earlier in the session and it took a while to get it back. It seems my embochure is much more relaxed on the bari, and it just takes more focus on the alto.

Is that a common experience in this context, i.e., going from bari to alto?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Yes it is. The thing is I have been playing alto 9 yrs straight. I am finally getting the results that I have been looking for since I started. I playing the bari for a concert band. I practice my alto everyday, I am wondering if the bari will mess up the sound I have worked so hard in obtaining on alto. Well the sound that I am still trying to work on, but a lot farther than I have gotten than in the past yrs.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,517 Posts
danarsenault said:
Playing different saxes barely qualifies as doubling. Yes, there are things to work on, but nothing like doubling on clarinet and flute.
I don't know, what about doubling from Bari or Bass Sax to Sopraninino? :O
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Something to keep in mind in doubling within the single reed family and something I have been successful with in my amatuer/semi-pro world, is to keep your mouthpiece/reed setups as complementary to each other as possible. Having said that, someone might look at my signature and say "How can a metal Berg on tenor with Java 3-1/2 reeds be complementary to a HR Meyer with bluebox 2-1/2's on alto and a HR Selmer on soprano". My response to that is: it works for me. It may not be the setup you find that workds for you. I find switching between the 3 to be relatively easy, and with my limited practice time, I need all the help I can get.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
Carbs said:
I don't know, what about doubling from Bari or Bass Sax to Sopraninino? :O
Same types of equipment, same fingerings, same embouchure principles. Flute has only similar fingerings but a completely different embouchure and breath support system, while clarinet has a different overtone series and embouchure from the saxophone. I have to go with Dan on this one.

Also, "sopraninino" is usually called "soprillo" or "sopranissimo."
 

·
Forum Contributor 2011, SOTW's pedantic pet rodent
Joined
·
8,322 Posts
I find the saxes reinforce each other (I admit i don't play bass, or, indeed, bari!). Flute i find a good double although the embouchure is obviously totally different. I love playing clarinet but i've always found the superficial similarities between it and sax confusing rather than helpful.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top