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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My bands decide that I should double on bari, while playing tenor and soprano at the same time....:baby:
Any tips for tossing in bari to the mix?
Also would it affect my tenor and soprano playing? I don't really want to be the jack of all trades and master of none...so I'm not sure if i should take the spot or push it on our alto player.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Do you get to tell the other "musicians" in your band what instruments to play?

When I moved to this area 15 years ago, I played bari because it was the only open chair in one of the local big bands. Once a tenor chair opened up, I sold the bari.

Tenor - it's all that matters. (Yes, I have a sop too but I don't tell anyone.)
 

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I play everything from nino to bass. Pays the rent.
 

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Best stick to same key instruments to make things easy, so push bari onto the alto player (as it's also in Eb) if they're not playing anything other than alto. You've already got your hands full playing tenor and soprano.

The only time I've had to double on tenor in a big band setting (I'm a bari player) was when we were a tenor short of a section, so I played tenor on some Miller numbers that didn't really require bari. The good thing is Yamaha baris and tenors have the sling ring positioned in such a way that I could use my bari sling on both without making any adjustments - usually I double on alto when playing bari so have to use two different length slings. But as both are pitched in Eb that makes doubling easier or if there are some alto bits which can be played on bari (or vice versa) then it's a doddle to play straight from the printed music without having to work out the transposition if it was Eb to Bb (or Bb to Eb).

If you do decide to play bari, then it won't affect your chops if you do (and it's much easier than tenor in some ways). But always aim for a full, supported tone as opposed to a thin, weak, farty and unsupported sound that so many bari part-timers make the mistake of thinking that's what a bari does and that it's 'easy to make a good sound' on bari.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm actually in a smaller, friend formed band. We lack a lot of low end, and I can play quite loudly compared to the others, therefore putting me on bari may be able to balance out the mix. But what with all the horrors of having 3 saxes to practice, maintain, drag around, and put on stage, with the lack of appropriate stands...the bari may not be for me...
 

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If it's a rock band, give the sop parts to the alto, and play the bari. Bari is the hippest horn in a good rock/soul band.
 

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The part of me that doesn't have to lug the damn thing around - agrees.
That is the primary problem. 16 lbs of brass tied to a string around your neck. 25+ lbs with the case gets real heavy real quick walking through an airport, and then there's the matter of where to store it -- it takes up a bit of room.

That said, I enjoy playing sop through bari. You will too.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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I found that taking up baritone helped my tenor playing, so I'm on the side that says yes.

the main stumbling block can be getting used to your ears/brain hearing a different pitch for each fingering, but it's something that IMO is worth learning sooner or later anyway so you might as well get it over with. Plus, as hakukani says, it's a hip horn, an attribute the soprano often struggles with.
 

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I found that taking up baritone helped my tenor playing, so I'm on the side that says yes.
I agree. My Bari is my lowest quality horn and when I get through playing it and pick up my tenor, I feel as if I can do anything because it's so much easier to play. The Bari takes focus and great air support to make sound good. it's a bit like running through water and than hitting dry land. It can be done but You feel almost as if you can fly once you get out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
it's a bit like running through water and than hitting dry land. It can be done but You feel almost as if you can fly once you get out.
Haha love that analogy...
In that case, what should I know about bari mouthpieces vs. tenor, opening size etc.
I play an STM 7* on tenor and a Metalite M7 for some louder occasions.
 

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It is a good idea to double. Make yourself the first person called for a gig and the last one to be let go. You learn a lot about your other horns when doubling. Do it. Mouthpieces: RPC, Drake, Berg Larsen, Lawton. Many good ones out there. What is your budget? I've found that I actually play a smaller opening on bari sax than tenor.

-anchorsax
 

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Every band I've ever played in, the alto player take the bari parts. Having said that, if you can get the alto player to play soprano and you take bari, that would be my preference.
 

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You've probably heard the old saying, "i don't charge to play - I charge to set up and tear down." Ask for more money. They really are a pain.
 

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In that case, what should I know about bari mouthpieces vs. tenor, opening size etc.
I play an STM 7* on tenor and a Metalite M7 for some louder occasions.
If you're comfortable with your Metalite M7 on tenor, get a bari Metalite MLM-7. It won't cost you much to find out if it's right for you and your bari -- probably less than 1% of the bari's cost. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
It is a good idea to double. Make yourself the first person called for a gig and the last one to be let go. You learn a lot about your other horns when doubling. Do it. Mouthpieces: RPC, Drake, Berg Larsen, Lawton. Many good ones out there. What is your budget? I've found that I actually play a smaller opening on bari sax than tenor.

-anchorsax
I'm no where even CLOSE to professional, just some high school tenor player who got their hands on a soprano sax.
I'm looking at something under $100, metal or hard rubber or plastic...I don't care, as long as it plays and won't poison me.
I'll go try a Metalite, but on tenor its really bright and I don't think I'll like something that bright on a bari. And those are hard to come by in my area.
 

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Advice? Play it like a saxophone and have fun.

I did exactly what you did, actually, playing soprano in quartet, tenor in PMEA and school bands, and bari in community band. It's really not a big deal, just maintain proper embouchure and air support and you'll be fine. In this world, you really can't get away with playing just one saxophone, too often.
 

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I'll go try a Metalite, but on tenor its really bright and I don't think I'll like something that bright on a bari. And those are hard to come by in my area.
Metalites are not nearly as bright on bari as on tenor. Great bari pieces. I finally whipped my metalite with a Wanne Durga, but it was better than a whole lot of fancy custom pieces.

Doubling is good for you. Carry on.
 

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i second on getting a smaller tip for bari than tenor. takes less air and the low notes are eaiser to pop out. make shure you have a very good stand for your bari- this is really important
 
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