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According to a couple of old posts at the woodwind.org forum...

"The Voxman "Selected Studies for Saxophone" uses a number of the Rose studies and etudes, and puts them in a better range for the saxophone, so no adjustments are needed.

Voxman uses (from the Rose 32) #26, #4, #18, #29, #21, and most interestingly the real #11 (not the simplified #11 in the Rose 32).

There may even be others."

and

"...Several Rose' items you mentioned are also in certain oboe/sax books as well. Ferling's 48 Famous Studies is one."

I know the Hite Foundation Studies are transcribed from the Baermann Third Division book.

I'm doing a bit of this by playing some of the Klose 25 daily studies on sax, clarinet, and flute, but most of the time I have separate books for each instrument.

If you just play sax you might play out of just one etude book, but doublers typcically work out of at least one etude book per instrument, so especially for those with limited time, there's the problem of being spread out too thinly.

So what do you think are the pros and cons of say playing the same Rose etudes on clarinet and sax to consolidate your practice routine? And if you also play oboe then you could play the same material on all 3. Does anyone do this?
 

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I think it depends on what you need. I need classical chops on Clarinet so I do the Spring warmup for that but on Tenor I need a solid alt and different scales for jazz so thats what I warm up on tenor. Alto, I need strong reading chops so thats what I warm up on alto. I think it all depends on what your needs are. K
 

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I don't think there's any particular technique-building value in playing the same etudes on different instruments. Most of the pieces (few of us "enjoy" Baermann III) you mention are well-written and satisfying to practice. That's why they've been adapted for multiple instruments, rather than their ability to somehow address the technical difficulties of disparate instruments. I suppose if you know and like the etudes, you'd be more willing to practice more? Doublers need to focus on the peculiar needs of each instrument (e.g., throat tones of the clarinet, pretty much everything on oboe and bassoon) to maximize their practice time.
 

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I think the most important aspect of multiple woodwind playing is sounding authentic- deep listening to the great masters and striving to emulate different aspects of their playing. This seems to be a lost practise these days, but in many ways it's more important that technical exercises and etudes.
It should include classical as well as non-classical artists.
Also, depending on your schedule your practice needs change to suit the demands of your work, whether they be technical or stylistic.....a session recording big band lead clarinet has different practice/listening needs to a quasi-orchestral show tune/record type session.
Then there is reed preparation........

Flute is all about sound and control, so some days you may never get to an étude, other days the sound locks in straight away.

All that said- for etudes I use Rose and Uhl on clarinet, Koehler and Andersen Opus 33 and Gariboldi on flute and on saxophone....it's been so many years since I played etudes seriously and I never feel I need anything more than a warm-up. But, when I did it was Karg Elert, Bozza, Massis and Samyn.

For listening....
Flute- rampal, baker, moyse, dolphy,
Clarinet- Sabine Meyer, paquito, Eddie Daniels, buddy DeFranco,
Sax- many classical artists- Robert black, delangle, Rousseau, Peter clinch+ others, dolphy, ornette, Coltrane, Joe Henderson, king Curtis, Sam Butera, Dexter, ben Webster, konitz, art pepper, macro, Kenny Garrett .....just too name a few
 
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