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I recently saw an article on the web about this, and it interested me right away.

How exactly do these concepts work? I read something about making a "tu-ku" sound, but it doesnt seem to work for me :| .
 

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Ask a trumpet player, they can tell you ALLLLLLLL about double and triple tonguing. Sadly, I cannot.
 

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I can double tongue easily on flute and brass, but when I do the same thing on the saxophone it sounds like a chicken.

Tu-Ku-Tu-Ku Tah-Kah-Tah-Kah Dugh-Gugh-Dugh-Gugh are all taught for double tonguing. A common approach is to start with the back of the tongue articulation first so that it comes on the strong part of the beat such as Kah-Tah-Kah-Tah.

I watched a trumpet clinic with young players once where the clinician had them all double tonguing in less than 10 minutes. He used:

HERE__________KIT.....TY.....KIT....TY...KIT...TY..KIT..TY.KIT.TYKITTYKITTYKITTY Something they could already say to produce the correct tongue movement. The word "here" represented the long tone they started with to establish the tone and the airstream. It worked great on trumpet. Good luck on sax, its much more difficult to make it sound good (in my experience).

John
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I just tried it on flute, and its actually pretty easy.

On sax though, it just sounds forced when I manage to make the sound. Oh well...

Btw, is Coltrane double-tonguing at the beginning of Mr. P.C?
 

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sod9728 said:
I just tried it on flute, and its actually pretty easy.


Btw, is Coltrane double-tonguing at the beginning of Mr. P.C?
I don't really know what was happening with Coltrane's tonguing, but Mr. PC is relatively easy to single tongue.
 

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sod9728 said:
I recently saw an article on the web about this, and it interested me right away.

How exactly do these concepts work? I read something about making a "tu-ku" sound, but it doesnt seem to work for me :| .
http://www.saxontheweb.net/Price/DoubleTonguing.html

Check my article above and hope it helps you.

Listen to Johnny Griffin and Sal Nistico a lot too!!!:)
 

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I think it's easyer to do "Kah-Tah" instead of "Tah-Kah". Is this wrong or...?
 

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hakukani said:
I don't really know what was happening with Coltrane's tonguing, but Mr. PC is relatively easy to single tongue.
As my clarinet teacher told me when I asked him about working on multiple tonguing: I'll teach you that when you can tongue regularly properly.

He said the same thing about circular breathing.
 

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I went to a masterclass with the great oboist/teacher John Mack. He was a great advocate of double-tonguing. He said that when he was young, he could single tongue as fast as most people could double tongue. However, as he got older, he found that his single tonguing slowed down, and he relied on double tonguing.
 

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Hi all,

I would like to ask/confirm a part of double tonguing.

As my own understanding, the "tu" is to "leave" the tip of the tongue from the tip of the reed so that the first sound can be produced. Then the "ku" is the back of the tongue "release from blocking the air from diagram" in order to produce the second sound. For these both sounds, the diagram keep constant pressure, i.e. pressure of diagram does not stop.

In other words, the first sound is produced because the tip leave the reed. The second sound is produced because air is released to the reed.

Then, after the "second sound", the tongue back to the bottom of the mouth, and now we can produce next cycle of "tu-ku".

As a result, by comparing with "normal tonguing", "double tonguing" will be more effective because 2 sounds can be produced by 1 "back-and-forth" of the tongue instead of 2 "back-and-forth" of the tongue in single tonguing.

Thank you so much for your clarification.

-Stanley
 
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